Tag Archives: value

Bordeaux on a Budget

Bordeaux is a classic region, home to classic wines. So often seen as unattainable, or even undrinkable, the wines of Bordeaux are slowly overcoming these misconceptions in the wine world. While serious wine collectors tend to focus on high-priced futures intended to be cellared for decades or on the rich, honeyed sweet wines of Sauternes, it is certainly possible to find both aged Bordeaux and ready-to-drink young Bordeaux at affordable prices—you just need to know what to look for.

Because outdated stereotypes can make these wines seem so intimidating, many casual wine drinkers don’t know enough about affordable Bordeaux to choose one for the dinner table. In reality, there is no need to feel overwhelmed, and the selection process can be simplified with a few easy pro tips:

1. Discover the Côtes de Bordeaux
Côtes de Bordeaux is comprised of the Right Bank regions of Blaye, Cadillac, Castillon and Francs. This collective of growers and producers banded together a few decades ago and were granted the Côtes du Bordeaux appellation status in 2009. In a way, this is similar to the way villages are attributed on the labels for Côtes du Rhone-Villages—each appellation adds its name to the Côtes de Bordeaux label, highlighting its own unique identity but identifying with the quality specifications of the Côtes de Bordeaux appellation as a whole.

A favorite value from the Cotes:
Chateau Les-Charmes Godard 2012

2. Buy older wines at a value
Some vintages are highly acclaimed at the time of their release (such as the heralded 2000 vintage), but then a few years later, even better vintages arrive—for example, 2005, 2009, and 2010. As a result, the 2000 will begin to lose some of its shine, followed by the 2005, and so on. Those vintages, when available, offer the great opportunity to purchase an older Bordeaux from an outstanding vintage.

Great picks include:
Château Simard Saint-Emilion 2005
Château Balestard La Tonelle 2005
Château Cap de Mourlin Grand Cru 2005

3. Find entry-level wines from fantastic vintages

There are highly-acclaimed vintages that demand extremely high prices from top châteaux, but a universally wonderful vintage means that even the under-$25, entry-level wines will be delicious. Currently, 2009, 2010 and 2011 can all be relied upon for high quality at low prices.

Some more-than-safe bets:
Château Lyonnat Lussac Saint-Emilion 2009
Château Fourcas Dupré 2010
Château Haut-Bellevue Haut-Médoc 2010
Château le Doyenné 2011

For a comprehensive list of the best deals in Bordeaux for this fall, shop this link.

 

 

 

The World’s Best Wine Values under $15.00

PicMonkey Collage

“I just could not spend another dime, I really wanted a wine that my friends and I could just drink and not talk about!” How often do you feel like this? Far too often I am sure. In my wine world, I taste and evaluate all price points and yes my soul awakens when I can taste and savor a glass of Krug Champagne or ponder over a pour of Château Latour – my pocketbook opens just once when those wines come into my periscope. So how about some wines that we all can afford? Where are the great value wines? The trends have been pointing towards Spain, Argentina and Chile, among other areas in the world. I agree those are the usual places that we should look. That said, when value-hunting, looking in unlikely places can often yield incredible discoveries. I have stumbled across three unlikely places for superb values under $15.00. Let’s take a look at Australia, Italy and the USA.

For two decades Australia has been lying in wait to be re-discovered. A star in the 1990’s this multi-faceted viticultural area has been fluttering in space. This was the country that had brought Shiraz (aka: Syrah) to the fore only to become mired in a “cheap” wine mode. Most recently the Aussies have made incredibly fine wines in all price ranges. The 2011 Wild Oats Shiraz drinks exceptionally well. Supported by some subtle sweet tannins for texture, this wine delivers its ripe fruit flavors all the way through its finish. Yes, this is one of the world’s best bargains in fine red wines.

When wine drinkers hear of Tuscany, they think of Chianti. As one of the world’s most revered regions, this area has found its sweet spot in the $20 to $40 range, but every once-in-a-while, one can uncover a super bargain and that is just what the 2010 Borgo Scopeto Chianti Classico offers. Decidedly sassy and true-to-the-region, this wine plays nicely into the hands of those that want to save a few $$$’s.

One area that one never hears of in the value camp is the USA and how about Oregon, no way! The 2013 Acrobat Pinot Gris is so succulently good. Plenty of ripe fruit and nice acidity, this wine outplays many wines in the $20+ range.

While the expensive and exotic marquis wines get all the ink and a few regions in the world have gained the reputation for their “great wine values,” the best values are often found in the most unlikely of places. As a wine retail veteran of 40+ years, I have learn that deals can show up from anywhere in the world. If you are like me (a bargain hunter) let the world be your oyster. Remember the best pearls are often found after the dirt has been washed away.

Finding good wine under $10


In tasting a lot of wine, one learns that price does not always dictate quality. However, in general, it can be a good indicator of what the bottle has in store. That’s why it’s exciting to find inexpensive wine that delivers well over its price tag. We can usually find a good number of wines under $20 that do this. Finding good wines under $10 can be more of a challenge. And since some of us are keeping our purse strings tighter, spending even $7 on a wine is an investment we would like to be sure pays off. 

Luckily, there are a few go-to regions or styles that consistently offer great value wines for around $10 a bottle.

cristalino

Cava – you cannot go wrong with most Cavas. Dry and crisp, this style of bubbly is a perfect solution for getting your bubble fix without breaking into the savings. Great as an aperitif, with some chinese take out, or in Mimosa form. Try Cristalino Brut Cava or Segura Viudas.

Vinho Verde – Refreshing. That’s the best word that describes this wine. Slightly fizzy, oh so slightly sweet, very low alcohol, crisp & fruity. We love this wine. It is perfect for lunch or on a hot day. Also makes a wildly good white sangria! Try Broadbent or Aveleda.

Chenin Blanc from South Africa – The most planted variety in the country, Southkanu Africa makes some pretty awesome dry Chenin Blanc. Similar to Sauvignon Blanc in  style, but with a slightly richer texture and lacking the grassy element of SB, Chenin is a great crisp, fresh wine. Some producers in the $10 range include Kanu, Indaba and MAN Vintners

Red cdrRhone blends – Rhone blends are great food wine and great party wines. An added benefit of being a blend is the ability to change the blend percentages each  year, depending on which grape variety fared best in each vintage. This creates  consistency in quality. Look for Cotes-du-Rhones from France – ‘05,’06 and ‘07 were excellent years.  Australia also make great value blends.

Spanish Monastrell – otherwise known as Mourvedre, the grape actually hails from Spain originally, but is now an integral part of the blends in the Southern Rhone, as well as Rhone blends around the world. In Spain, the vine thrives in the hot, dry weather of Jumilla and Yecla, where it produces dense, concentrated wines with lots of jammy fruit and low price tags. Spicy and smooth, these are great value wines. Try the Bodega Castano Monastrell.