Nebbiolo Prima

 

A showcase of just-released Barolo, Barbaresco, and Roero wines

Every BaroloBottlesBlindMay Albeisa, the Unione Produttori Vini Albesi (Union of Producers of wines from the Alba area), hosts journalists from all over the world for an event called, Nebbiolo Prima, one of the most important Italian wine summits of the year. This year over 250 wineries submitted a total of nearly 500 of their just-released Barolo, Barbaresco, and Roero wines as part of this blind tasting and pre-marketing event.

Up for examination were the following wines: Barolo (2012 and 2010 Riserva), Barbaresco (2013 and 2011 Riserva), Roero (2013 and 2012 Riserva).

While the entire tasting is done blind (producer names are not given until the end of each tasting day), the village denominations are grouped and revealed to the journalists beforehand.

With over 100 wines to assess each morning, there isn’t time to deeply analyze each and every one. Having done the event many times, I focus on getting an overall impression of each vintage for each denomination and villages, while noting obvious standouts. I make brief tasting notes for each wine and score top wines with three stars down to 2.5, and so on to 0.5 stars. I don’t give any stars to wines that are acceptable, however not spectacular in any way.

Barolo
The 2012 growing season started with a very wet winter and spring. Warm temperatures and continued precipitation in June contributed to vegetative growth but reduced berry set. Neither was a huge concern as less compact clusters help prevent disease and the soil’s water reserves helped the vines survive a very hot late summer. Though results for 2012 Barolo were mixed, some villages—and wines—clearly outshone their counterparts.

Barolo vineyards Sep 2012 fogWithin the 2012 vintage, I awarded the most points to wines in the Barolo “più communi” (many villages) category. These are often labeled as “Classico” or simply state “Barolo” on the label. They show big, sweet, dense, red cherry, cinnamon, marzipan, potpourri, chalky but ripe tannins, and are quite balanced overall with integrated floral notes. (39 wines; 18 total stars for the category)

Barolo from the village of La Morra scored highest of all of the single villages. The best 2012 La Morra Barolo reveal pretty mint and rose, sweet aromas of wild strawberry, and a polished texture; others are huge in structure with tannins that need to resolve. But even some of the more challenged samples retain enough fruit and non-fruit characters to support the power. One particularly striking example of the potential of this vintage was Renato Ratti’s Barolo from the Conca cru. Intense and gorgeous aromas of rose, licorice, and fresh herbs pop out of the glass. This complex young wine is already in balance, showing potential for a long life ahead. (57 wines; 32.5 stars)

Ripe red cherries, smoke, dark earth, and sweet tannins characterize the best Barolos from the Verduno village. One of my favorites was Alessandria Fratelli’s San Lorenzo Barolo. Its aromas of red cherry, cologne, spice and forest floor lead to a full, lush mouthfeel and that is still a bit tight but pleasant. (14 wines; 6 stars)

The Castiglione Barolos show a concentration of ripe unctuous black cherry; they have bold structure and sweet perfume. One of the most representative samples of the best from the village was Cascina Bongiovanni’s Pernanno Barolo, which is full of heightened black cherry, sweet rose, and fine-grained tannins. (18 wines; 7.5 stars)

The best 2012 Barolos from the Barolo village are identified by smoke, tar, earth, and rose with ripe red and blackberry, marked aromatics, a juicy mid-palate, and polished tannins. Two single vineyard Barolos from Borgogno, the Cannubi and Fossati, were among my favorites. The Cannubi shows lovely aromatics of mint and cherry whereas the Fossati, while also pretty on the nose, shows a bitter spice quality that isn’t unpleasant—both still prominently showing their youth. (41 wines; 16.5 stars)

The Serralunga Barolos are profoundly structured with distinct aromas of tobacco and fireplace. The best ones integrate rose petal, potpourri, and forest aromatics with ripe red cherry fruit and refined tannins; on the other hand, some are thwarted by oak. Standouts included GD Vajra’s Baudana, which is a gorgeous wine with mixed berry compote in the mid-palate, scents of perfume and ash, and a linear, powerful finish. Another extraordinary Barolo from the village was the Pio Cesare Ornato, which gives off the canonical tar and roses, with a hint of fireplace. It is clean, pure, on point, and balanced. (46 wines; 16.5 stars)

The Monforte wines in general had aromas of candied fruit and cocoa, were concentrated with super ripe blackberry, raspberry, and black plum on the palate, and the tannins were strong and rough in many cases. Sorì Ginestra from Conterno Fantino was an outstanding example of the best from the village in 2012; while fleshy and certainly in its adolescence, it isn’t coarse like some. The Pecchenino was the prettiest with currant, blackberry, eukalyptus, and silky tannins. (43 wines; 9.5 stars)

Barbaresco
The 2013 growing season in Piemonte was a funny one in that everything was delayed by about two weeks. Low temperatues slowed the vegetative cycle in the spring and while cool weather can lead to good acidity levels in resultant wines, it also necessitated longer hang time in the fall, which led to a vintage with mixed results. While aromatics could be lovely, some wines were herbal and thin. Some examples seemed too advanced or were thick with bitter tannins. The best 2013 Barbarescos find a nice balance in range of aromas and flavors. The wines came in all over the board.

barbarescoAlbino Rocca’s single cru Angelo Barbaresco was my highest scoring 2013 Barbaresco from the Barbaresco village. Its engaging bouquet of ripe, red cherry, smoke, dried violets, and sweet rose surprised me and stood out among the other 100 wines that Tuesday; the palate is juicy and finish, long and fine-tuned. (33 wines; 16.5 stars)

Among the 2013s from Treiso, many were smoky, tight and rustic with some problems of over-oakiness. But some of the better ones showed elegance. (19 wines; 11stars)

One of the best examples among the 2013 Neive Barbarescos was Moccagatta’s Basarin. Scents of camp fire, cinnamon, black cherry, and fresh herbs reveal themselves, leading to a wine that is both delightful and supple on the palate. (39 wines; 19.5 stars)

The Barbaresco “più communi” (many villages) category didn’t show so well overall. Though the Produttori del Barbaresco’s 2013 Barbaresco comes forward a little too bold, it shows consistency and balance of ripe fruit through to the finish. (12 wines; 3 stars)

Roero
The 2013 vintage of Roero (23 wines; 19 stars) and 2012 Roero Riserva (24 wines; 16 stars), as a whole, were the best I’ve ever tasted! Normally as a category Roero can be a mixed bag but not in these vintages; overall they were some of the best wines of the week. The besbarolosheett 2013s did an amazing job showing off pretty Roero aromatics, redolent of orange peel, strawberry candy, and mint or sometimes a mix of dark fruit, forest and cocoa. Either way the wines are perfumed, lush and charming. One of the best examples of the latter style was Malvirà’s 2013 Roero Classico. Their 2012 Riservas showed amazingly well too; my favorite was the Vigna Trinità. Powerful aromas of violets and roses lead to a refined integration throughout the palate of bold and juicy fruit as well as cocoa-powdery tannins. Other notable bottlings from the 2012 Malvira Riservas were the Vigna Mombeltramo and Vigna Renesio.

There were 66 wines in the Barolo 2010 Riserva and Barbaresco 2011 Riserva categories, though overall I scored them low in stars. The same can be said for the Barolos from Novello (14 wines) and Barbarescos from Alba (4 wines).

Find more information about the event and the Albeisa organization at these links.

http://www.albeisa.it/pagine/eng/albeisa.lasso

http://www.albeisa.it/welcome_eng.lasso

 

 

 

 

Is Hangover-free Wine Finally Here?

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In news that will excite over-zealous (and just moderately zealous) wine drinkers everywhere, researchers at UC Davis have just revealed a successful new endeavor that will allow hedonistic oenophiles to enjoy an all-you-can drink evening of indulgence — without the painful hangover the following morning. It sounds too good to be true, but a team of viticulturists has been quietly working for nearly a decade to develop a grape variety that contains all of the pleasurable elements needed to produce wine, with none of the harmful effects (although they will not accept responsibility for your regrettable karaoke decisions after a few too many glasses).

There is a known link between phenols, a group of chemical compounds that affect the color, aroma, and taste of a wine, and anthocyanins, which contribute color but little else. Anthocyanins are also known to contain antioxidant properties, which carry great health benefits. Phenols, on the other hand, are the main culprit causing your wine hangover. In a series of lab tests beginning in 2007, scientists discovered that some phenols are worse than others, and the goal of the recently completed project was to isolate the set of phenols that lack detrimental characteristics.

The new grape variety, known as Gueule de Bois, is a crossing of Gamay, which is notably low in phenols, and Saperavi, a darkly pigmented ancient Georgian variety with high levels of anthocyanins. A special enzymatic treatment is used to remove harmful phenols. The resulting wines have a deep purple hue, firm tannic structure, and aromas and flavors of violets and blackcurrants.

After perfecting the production process in the lab, Davis researchers decided to use their conveniently available population of undergraduate students in order to test the wine. Unsurprisingly, it has been a massive success. Olivia Marshall, a junior majoring in communications, raved about her experience with the new beverage, explaining, “I was able to drink two whole bottles of Gueule de Bois. I don’t remember much — I think it tasted pretty good — but I do know that I managed to make it to my 9 a.m. econ class the following morning and ace my exam on marginal utility!”

The first bottlings of Geule de Bois are expected to hit retail shelves and restaurant wine lists in fall of 2016. We can’t wait to experience our first night of guilt-free gluttony, but until then we will all have to keep our Advil and Gatorade close to our nightstands.

Bringing back an old friend: The Wines of Chile have reached a new level

16_02_01 1500 Master Class Chile@Wine.com_3180_Blog

Way back in the dark ages of wine retailing (circa: 1970s), fine wine shops had Bordeaux, Burgundy and Champagne. Chile was nowhere to be found and even California was an afterthought. As the years went by and California gained prominence with the Judgement of Paris, Chile got into the marketplace with its cheap Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlots. Often found in sale bins, these became the drinking wines of budget conscious wine imbibers. I drank so much of these bargain basement wines that I ended up throwing the whole class into the “good value” category. As an active retailer in San Francisco in those days, the wines of Chile gave me something “to stack high and let them fly.”

This is no longer the case. While Chile took a back seat to Australian Shiraz and Argentine Malbec, producers started to find the right fit with varieties and vineyards, including Chile’s flagship variety, Carmenere. This wise move is still working its way into the hearts and minds of international wine consumers. More exciting is the work being done with cool climate Sauvignon Blanc from Casablanca and mineral-like Chardonnays from Limarí, not to mention major statements being made with Syrah, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and blends. While the country is still known for value wines, production over the past decade proves it shall be known for quality as well.

Jake Pippin, USA Market Manager for Wines of Chile, recently presented an array of a dozen top Chilean wines that would measure up with top wines from anywhere in the world. So while I cut my teeth on cheap Chilean Merlot in the 1970s, I know have been introduced to some of the world’s very top wines and they are Chilean. It is time for Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne and yes, the Napa Valley to share the spotlight; the Chileans are making a huge statement. Isn’t great to revisit an old friend and see how they have evolved into something greater? Here is a trio of super fine Chilean wines that will bring you up to speed on where Chilean wines are today.

The 2014 Errazuriz Wild Ferment Chardonnay, – rich and creamy, but with a zippy layer of minerality to keep it fresh
The 2012 Calcu Cabernet Franc  – yes, Cabernet Franc can shine here, with earthy, peppery spice and dried fruit character
The 2012 Los Vascos Grande Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon – classic producer with a classic, quality Cabernet – it says Chile and Cabernet in a concise, easy-drinking way.

Wine.com 100: Brangelina, the Today Show & Olive Garden

This week we released the 9th annual Wine.com 100, a list of the top selling (by number of bottles) wines of Wine.com over the first 11 months of 2015. Most of these wines are no surprise. Meiomi was #1, Veuve Clicquot was #2… most are fairly well-known brands, or wines that made a fairly large production and are well-rated and well-loved. A few are more off the beaten path, but there are 3 that stick out to me and I credit pop culture for their rise in fame!

Continue reading “Wine.com 100: Brangelina, the Today Show & Olive Garden”

Rating Wines: Is it Art or Science?

WWglassWhen I was in my 20’s and had just gotten a taste for wines, I thought, “Wow!” This is fun! I also  had the perfect forum to launch my wine-loving career. My family owned and operated Ashbury Market, which was a mere two blocks from the infamous Haight-Ashbury corner. What a place to begin what would become a lifetime of tasting wines. Continue reading “Rating Wines: Is it Art or Science?”