Tag Archives: muscat

Happy Moscato Day!

When I was a little kid, everyone got a glass of sparkling wine for celebrations. All the adults would get a glass of champagne, and the kids got tiny cordial glasses filled with moscato d’asti. Fast forward to today, when a liquor delivery truck covered in a giant ad for pink moscato tried to run me right off the Bay Bridge! Moscato has come a long way from those fun family occasions to mega buck in the wine business. What has happened to moscato in all this time? It’s flavored and colored and sweetened beyond what I remember. Let’s take a look at some of the traditional styles of muscat and moscato and the foods that pair with them.


Muscat is thought to be one of the oldest wine grape varieties, and is planted in every major wine country in the world.  The dry style of muscat is commonly grown in Alsace and some regions in Spain. With it’s orange blossom and tropical fruit aromas and crisp finish, dry muscats are a great match for spicy foods or difficult to match Pan-Asian cuisine. I love these wines with Thai green curry shrimp, grilled fish with mango salsa, fish tacos, or Morracan-style chicken made with preserved lemons. Here are some great examples of the dry-style of Muscat:

Muscat


Moscato d’Asti, or any other fizzy moscato, has exploded in popularity. Since 2011, sales have grown by 70+% and show no signs of slowing down. While there are all kinds of flavored moscato or moscato colored red or pink, nothing beats a traditional Moscato d’Asti. With it’s lively aromas of peach and nectarine, gentle bubbles, and softly sweet style, this fizzy wine is a charming and pleasing wine. Many people use this wine as a cocktail, but I enjoy it with many foods. Moscato d’Asti is an awesome match with any fruit and cheese platter. Try it with a grilled pear & blue cheese salad that is dressed with a champagne vinaigrette.  A Waldorf salad with grilled chicken, grapes, and apples is another great match for Moscato. Here are some of my favorite Moscato d’Asti:

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Dessert-style muscats are awesome wines especially for you folks that love chocolate. The rich and aromatic wines from the South of France, Sicily, or Australia are a great way to finish any dinner party with a bang. You can match them up with a blue cheese and fig cake cheese course or even something simple like store-bought pound cake with peach sauce. A chocolate cake soaked in Grand Marnier has a best friend in dessert-style muscat. A warm peach & blackberry cobbler with or without ice cream is another delicious pairing. Here are a couple great examples of a dessert-style muscat:

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As you can see, the centuries old muscat grape is as versatile and fresh as ever. It is more than a pool-side sipper or something the kids drink while at the club. Have this wine throughout the meal, and enjoy it with your favorite summer fare. As they say in Italy “Faciamo brindisi!” with a glass of Moscato!

Free the muscat

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Trends come and go, but most are fun and some are important. Over the last few years, Muscat has picked up global attention. A lot of this stuff  is sweet and fizzy and oh so easy to drink. But Moscato has not always been a trend. In it’s home base of Piedmont, Italy, it is known as Moscato d’Asti, and this wine has been in vogue for some time. While I have often enjoyed the sugar babies that are sweet and fizzy, my vote goes to the dried versions and that is why I would like to free the muscat.

Recently our team met with Master of Wine Olivier Humbrecht, and tasted several of his wines, including the 2012 Domaine Zind Humbrecht Muscat (Vin d’Alsace). I found the wine absolutely charming and stylish. With just a smidgen of sugar at 5 grams/liter (consumer threshold is around 6-7 grams), the wine stays between the stages of dry to barely sweet. In this area of sweetness, the wine can perform wonders with savory dishes like Szechuan Scallops on a b bed of noodles, as well with a faintly sweet dessert like Linzertorte, a common dish in Eastern Europe.

So I say, “Let us free the Muscat.” Enjoy this wine with some of your favorite foods and open a world of wine and food pleasures that you may have never known.