Tag Archives: mother’s day

Food & Wine Fridays: Mother’s Day Brunch

Ok… How many times have you made pancakes for Mom on Mother’s Day? Surprise her this year with sophisticated brunch that pairs up well with wine or mimosas. These dishes are easy to prep ahead to time so that you can enjoy a glass of wine, too!

 

The Croque Madame

The Croque Madame

This variation on the classic Croque Monsieur is a wonderful brunch sandwich. I have simplified it a bit to make it easier to cook for your hungry family. Served with home fries of a light salad and you have a meal fit for the Madame of the house!

Pro Tips: You can make the Mornay Sauce the night before. It’s easier to scoop and spread when chilled. First thing in the morning, prep the sandwiches on a cookie sheet to save yourself some time, then all you need to do is broil them and fry eggs at brunch time. This recipe makes 2 sandwiches, but it multiplies easily to feed a crowd.

For the Mornay Sauce:

  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 tablespoon flour
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1Ž4 salt
  • dash of nutmeg
  • 4 ounces grated gruyere cheese (I have also used emmanthaler or white cheddar)

For the sandwiches:

  • 4 slices of good white bread ( The traditional bread is the French pain mie, but I use buttermilk bread or potato bread also)
  • Dijon mustard
  • 3 ounces of thinly sliced deli ham ( I love black forest ham)
  • 2 ounces grated gruyere (or 2 thin slices)
  • 2 large eggs fried sunny side up
  • freshly ground pepper to taste

To make the sauce:

  1. In a saucepan, melt the butter. Add the flour to the butter and whsk well to make a roux.
  2. Cook for a couple of minutes at medium heat to cook out any floury taste, but do not brown.
  3. Whisk in the milk and continue cooking until the sauce can coat the back of a wooden spoon.
  4. Season with salt and nutmeg.
  5. Remove from heat, and whisk in the cheese.
  6. Cool the mixture and keep in the refrigerator over night.

Sandwich assembly:

  1. Heat your oven to broil.
  2. Toast the bread.
  3. On a baking sheet, lay 2 of the slices of bread and spread a thin layer of the mustard.
  4. On each slice of bread with 1.5 ounces of the ham, 1/4 cup of the mornay sauce, and 1 ounce of the grated cheese.
  5. Top each sandwich with the remaining slice of bread and then 1/4 of mornay sauce.
  6. Broil the sandwiches until they are golden brown and delicious.
  7. Place the sandwich on a plate, top with a fried egg, and season with the pepper. Stand back and watch your favorite Madame say, “oooh, la, la!”

Wines to go with:



Shrimp and Asparagus Omelet with Avocado

Shrimp and Asparagus Omelet with Avocado

This a super omelet with an easy “make ahead” filling. The avocado adds the lush richness of a hollandaise sauce without the trauma of trying to make it.

Pro tips: Remember, asparagus is a basically a flower. The tightest and most closed spears are the freshest.

For each omelet you will need:

  • 3 large eggs
  • 6-8 u 25 shrimp
  • 4-5 asparagus spears cut in pieces
  • 1/3 of an avocado sliced
  • butter
  • salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

The night before, blanch the asparagus in salted water and drop into ice water bath to stop the cooking. Drain and store in the fridge. Blanch the shrimp until they just turn pink in a mix of water, white wine, a couple lemon slices, and salt and pepper. Drop them in an ice water bath to stop the cooking and store in the fridge.

The next day, in a pan with butter, heat up the shrimp and asparagus. Season with salt and pepper. Whisk 3 eggs in a bowl with a tablespoon of water to keep them loose. Heat a sauté or omelet pan on medium, and add a pat of butter to the pan. When the butter is melted and foamy, add the eggs. Keep them moving in the pan to create a nice round base. To the side of the pan opposite from the handle, add your filling. Hold the handle firmly and tip the omelet onto the plate flipping the empty half over the filling. Garnish the top of the omelet with a shrimp, slice of avocado, and an asparagus spear. This is also a great dinner omelet!

 

Wines to go with:

 

Working Moms in the Wine Industry: Happy Mother’s Day to all of you!

Moms deserve so much credit. In most cases they are the ones who spend endless hours raising the next generation and with working moms the load becomes increasingly strenuous. But how about working moms in the wine industry? Does the industry that provides the adult population with some of the greatest libations on earth serve up additional challenges? Alison Crowe, winemaker for Garnet Vineyards and consulting winemaker for additional projects, explains, “The uncertain hours of Mother Nature can wreak havoc on a family’s schedule. Harvest is usually quite unpredictable and everyone has to be extra flexible, kids and parents alike. Since my two boys are so small, I sometimes can take them with me to the vineyards to teach them about the growing season and the natural world, but the daily reality is that it’s tough to juggle activities, to get them ready for daycare, and to get them fed and put to bed.”

Wine industry professionals are also called upon to host winery events, dinners and trade sales calls, which sometimes happen at night and on weekends. Crowe says, “The late nights are definitely an extra challenge of the job and means sometimes I don’t see the kids until they wake up the next day. I’m lucky I have a very supportive spouse as well as in-laws who live nearby; we’ve pieced together a system that seems to work.”

Though “wine country living” may seem like a fantasy to many of us, the reality is perhaps different for the working moms of the wine business. Crowe admits, “Living in Napa you are surrounded by an incredible array of some of the finest food in the world. Just like any parent, however, you have to model the balanced food choices you want your kids to make. Juice is watered down, sweets are limited, but great organic produce, cheese and wine (for the grown-ups) are definitely part of the “treats” that bring a lot of pleasure and enjoyment to gatherings. Lessons about wine, history and cooking are just as important to teach and model for our kids as the numbers around nutrition.” Children often emulate their parents and wine adds another twist to busy career moms. It is not just about having a busy mom, but one who deals in a beverage with and health and social ramifications.

One of the busiest and respected working moms in the wine biz is Dr. Valery Uhl. Besides growing grapes and being a serious student of the industry, she is knee deep in the wine judging circuit as an accomplished wine taster and the Director of the North of the Gate Wine Competition (NOTG). Valery, a physician and surgeon since 1985, gave birth to her son Tristan in 1997 while obtaining her Viticulture Management degree at Santa Rosa Junior College. She took one day off a week from her thriving oncology (cancer) practice  San Francisco bay area and drove 60 miles north to take classes from 8:00 AM to 10:00 PM. Recounting the dual career journey, Valery included her son in her global wine travels. Tristan has been to every continent, except Antarctica. Over the years, both mom and son enjoyed working together in the family’s wine business ventures, including their prized T n T Vineyards in the Russian River Valley. As a mom, Valery’s top priority has been to include her son in her wine adventures whenever possible.

I first met Michaela Rodeno at Domaine Chandon when we were both young, and I was so impressed by her kindness and professionalism. She carried herself with great ease and she still managed take excellent care of her family. Michaela, a winery professional of 40 years, comments, “Our children were born in the 1980’s in a time where there were growing social concerns about alcohol. So being in the wine industry, it was important that our son, John, and daughter, Kate, were not excluded from our world. We taught out kids to be our wine waiters (at age 5). Dinner was our only time to be together, so the kids would open and pour the wine, then decamp after eating to leave Gregory and me alone (in peace) to finish the wine and catch up, talk, relax. They were very proud of their skills with corkscrew and pouring adeptness. As a result, they both enjoy a healthy attitude towards wine.” Michaela spent 15 years at Domaine Chandon as Vice President of Marketing and 21 years as CEO at Saint Supery. Please check out her newly published book, From Bubbles to Boardrooms in two volumes. The link is amzn.to/16eT6Xv. She is now running the family winery Villa Ragazzi.

The challenges of any industry can be incredible. In the wine industry, working moms have the added burden that centers on the subject at hand: “Wine.” What say you? Let us salute all the working moms in the wine industry.