Tag Archives: chardonnay

WineShopper Tasting Notes

A few of the Wine.com staff got together to taste some of this week’s WineShopper wines. Here’s what they had to say:

Geyser Peak 2006 Cabernet Sauvignon

Kristin: A little restrained at first but opens up nicely with some lush berry flavors, nicely integrated tannins and oak – how can you beat this Cab for the price!? Serve at your next dinner party and watch them ooh and ahh.

Matt: A solid fruity cabernet with plum and cherry flavors that will have your friends guessing the cost of the bottle is double of what you actually paid. I’d recommend having this with pork or a hearty stew.

Kristine: The smokiness and berry flavors definitely stand out. Not overly bold for a Cab, making it easy to pair with a variety of meals and pleasing to a variety of palates. The price makes it taste even better, a great selection to stock up on for a party.

Heggies 2007 Chardonnay

Kristin: Very nice nose with abundant fragrant citrus and some floral, crisp and steely on the palate like a fine Burgundy, just the right amount of fruit to balance some nice acid – I would definitely pick up a bottle of this wine to serve with a French influenced meal.

Matt: A refreshing Chardonnay with lemon and citrus flavors that would be a great addition to a BBQ or a Sunday picnic in the park. My friends and I tried the bottle on the weekend and they all loved it.

Kristine: Mmmmm…what a delightful fruity smell. Crisp and medium bodied with a notable amount of acid.

Bodegas Palacio 2005 Reserva Especial

Kristin: Wow, is this a Rioja? Very appealing peppery, almost jammy nose and ripe fruit flavors, with the classic acidic backbone you expect in a great Rioja – my favorite of the bunch for its great balance of fruit, oak and acid.

Kristine: Beautifully dark, pleasantly peppery, and enjoyably acidic. Loved it. Also my favorite of the three. I would serve this with pork chops during a romantic dinner for two.

One of the other Wine.com staff snuck off with the bottle before Matt could enjoy it.

******

WineShopper is an exclusive, members-only website that features limited time and limited quantity wine deals, ranging from everyday drinking to cellar collectibles. Sign-in with your Wine.com account to check out this week’s wines and other great deals atwww.WineShopper.com.

Staff Pick: WineShopper – Chateau St Jean 2007 Reserve Chardonnay

Wine: Chateau St Jean 2007 Reserve Chardonnay

Reviewer: Kristin Balabanian

Rating: 5 stars

 

Wow! My first impression of the Chateau St Jean 2007 Reserve Chardonnay is its exceptional aroma: very distinct tropical notes but with an underlying creamy vanilla. While it isn’t a butter bomb a la Rombauer, it definitely hits some of those lush notes in a nicely balanced way. On the palate the nice viscous weight is impressive and what you would expect from a reserve Chardonnay from a quality producer like Chateau St Jean. The finish is strong and leaves you with nice bright fruit flavors and a touch of vanilla. While this wine is from the 2007 vintage, it tastes very fresh and lively!

 

Check out WineShopper tomorrow Feb. 15th at 9 am to purchase this 90 point Chardonnay for only $22.49 (50% off)!

 

 

Sonoma Travels

Over Labor Day weekend I was able to enjoy two things: a weekend with old and wonderful girlfriends and a weekend away from my toddler (LOVE the child, but time away is rare, therefore glorious!).

What do 10 girls in Sonoma do all day? Visit wineries of course! While we also enjoyed long lunches and brunches, a few winery visits are worth mentioning.

I was obliged to be at the Sonoma Wine Country Weekend on Saturday, so I will mention how fantastic that event was – the wines (and food!) were excellent and the weather could not have been better. If you're looking for a great way to spend 5 hours on the Saturday of Labor Day, I highly recommend this festival. Great selection of wines from all over Sonoma, some new labels I'd never seen, as well as some new wineries. And the food… did I mention the food? From Kobe beef sliders to fig pizza, there were some delicious samples going on from the restaurants and food providers of Sonoma. While I was delighting my taste buds at this festivity, the other gals had a memorable visit with Ravenswood, and I returned to find bottles of Zinfandel lined up for later consumption. My red wine drinking friends were quite delighted in the hospitality and wine quality of Ravenswood and I was sorry to miss it.

Sunday's trip included more yummy sipping.

Cuvaison – I'm quite familiar with Cuvaison – I remember they make Chardonnay and I'd recognize their label anywhere, but I could not remember the last time I actually tasted it. Since they've been around for a while, I expected an old school style winery and tasting room, but to our surprise, the winery we entered was hugely modern, with glass walls showing off the sunlight, and lots of room to move. Plus tables! A plethora of tables and chairs for guests to sit and enjoy their wine while taking in the incredible view of Carneros. All these modern-looking glass windows and panes had one more attribute – it helped the winery rely on solar power for much of its energy.
And the wine…
The entry level Chardonnay we tasted was hallmark California Chardonnay, but of the new style – meaning not overly oaked, but nicely balanced between fruit, acid and oak. It was clean, yet rich in texture. It made me remember that Carneros Chardonnay is not Central Coast Chardonnay – this wine had more crisp than creamy in the mouthfeel. We also tasted the higher-end Chardonnay, which, unfortunately, is only sold in restaurants and the tasting room. This always frustrates me as I think consumers should have equal opportunity to buy wine in restaurants and retail stores, but many wineries make labels solely for on-premise use, and the higher end Chardonnay and Pinot at Cuvaison are made in this manner. So while I do recommend – with renewed enthusiasm – the Chardonnay that is well-recognized by all, I also recommend a trip to the winery if you're next in Carneros to taste their other offerings. It was a nice surprise – both the winery set up and the wine itself.

A final added bonus – the winery is directly across from Domaine Carneros! My favorite place to sit on a beautiful day to sip bubbles. Which is exactly what we did. This winery is always worth a visit. The service is knowledgeable and friendly, and the view from the deck is incredible. Plus how can you beat an afternoon munching on cheese, sipping on bubbles and basking in the Sonoma sun?

So your stops for your next trip to Carneros? Cuvaison & Domaine Carneros.
And what you're doing next Labor Day? Sonoma Wine Festival.

Chardonnay from Oregon is crazy good

Living in the Pacific Northwest gives me total access to the Willamette Valley wine country and after living here for over a year, I can say I've visited… twice. Yes, tis sad. I blame it on my travel, my husband's travel and a baby (who is now a toddler). It just has not happened near as often as I'd like. Luckily, a colleague's visit last week was the impetus to get us out the door and down to some wineries. Instead of dragging you through each visit and what we tasted, I'm going to do what I like to call the tasting takeaway – in other words, Oregon Chardonnay rocks.

We visited Adelsheim, where we tasted through the lineup in their lovely new tasting room (best bathrooms ever!). Though I have always been a fan of their Pinot Gris and Elizabeth's Reserve Pinot Noir, I came away loving their Chardonnay, too. Though I know many dislike this comparison, it really was Burgundian in style – luscious and round, yet crisp and light on the palate. Made with 100% Dijon clone and no malo-lactic fermentation, the wine was mineral-driven yet textured. Duly impressed.

At this point I'm liking Chardonnay, but not swooning. Till I reach Shea Vineyard. Hands down, my favorite wine was their Chardonnay. And to be honest, we tasted some pretty amazing wines out of barrel that day. But I could not help going back to the Chardonnay – it was the best Oregon Chardonnay I'd ever tasted, and one of the best Chardonnays from anywhere I'd tasted (in a while at least). I've also loved the offerings from Argyle (Nuthouse Chardonnay is excellent) and Domaine Drouhin, but it's been a while since I've tasted those and I just see so much more Oregon Pinot Gris.

Why aren't more people talking about Oregon Chardonnay? Maybe the are and I'm missing it. Yes, Pinot Gris can be delicious, but when you think of Oregon's climate and it's ability to create amazing Pinot Noir, why do we so often also think of Pinot Gris instead of Chardonnay? Burgundy, Carneros, Russian River – most great Pinot Noir growing regions make great Chardonnay as well. Like every great region, there will be some Chardonnay not worth the effort, but the potential here I think is stellar.

So when it comes to white wine from Oregon, what do you gravitate towards and why?

Mmmm… Carmenere

So I've taken a week to hang out with my folks in the DC area so that they can spend time hanging out with their granddaughter and I can get some work done. One of the benefits of this trip is going through the few cases of wine I sent them the week before.

One of these cases included the a few Chilean wines from our Support Chile program, where every case sold donates $100 to the relief effort in Chile.

Two of these wines were tasted over the weekend, both from Errazuriz -the Errazuriz Single Vineyard Carmenere and the Wild Ferment Chardonnay. I've tasted both before, but I loved re-tasting them because they were even better!

First, the Carmenere – if you aren't sure about Carmenere or have never tried it before, this is the bottle to try! Ripe, rich fruits are supported by lots of spice and hints of smoke. Great structure and balance between that fruit and spice. You can tell it's Carmenere from the flavors, but there are no bell pepper or green notes, something that occurs in Carmenere if the grapes are not ripened enough. I can assure you that the grapes used for Errazuriz ripened enough. I don't have a scale, nor do I rate wines, but I will say that this is the best example of Carmenere I have yet tasted.

Next up, the Wild Ferment Chardonnay – I drank this with my dad as he is not a fan of big, buttery, over-oaked Chardonnay. And while this is not big or over-oaked, the nose certainly gives away it's Chardonnay, and one that used oak. New oak. So if you are not a fan of any oak, this is not the wine for you. But if you like a wine that is balanced with oak, you will enjoy this bottling. There are ripe, tropical fruits, baked apples, a bit of vanilla spice, roasted nuts and toast. But on the palate this is all well-balanced by bright acidity and the finish is quite long. Don't get me wrong – this is a creamy, luscious Chardonnay. But a well-done one for a nice price.

Don't forget to support Chile with us here at Wine.com! You have now till the end of March to use your Chilean wine habit to do good! Go here for more info.

What is your favorite Chilean wine & why?