Category Archives: Wine Tips

Wine and Heat – Eternal Enemies

Heat is to wine like water is to oil…they just don’t mix. In fact, once the juice is in the bottle there is nothing one can do that is more detrimental to the long term health of the wine, than expose it to extended periods of long heat. When a wine is exposed to high temperatures in transit or storage, the liquid expands and several things may happen. It may force the cork from the neck of the bottle, pushing it up under the capsule. This is called a “pushed” or “raised” cork. Or the wine may expand and leak around the cork. This is called a “leaker.”

In either case, when the liquid cools it will contract, and this may result in air seeping in around the cork leading to a further problem, oxidation. Cooked wines won’t have any freshness to the fruit aromas or flavors – instead you’ll get a stewed, prune-like profile. If you’re getting blackcurrants and fresh summer fruits, for example, then you haven’t got a cooked wine. On the palate, a cooked wine often seems thin, lacking body and character.

As an internet wine retailer, Wine.com is extremely cognizant of the perils of summer shipping, and we are doing our best to get you your wine to arrive in as pristine condition as possible. Here are a few safeguards to help keep your wine protected from the summer heat when ordering wine online from Wine.com, and after the wine has been delivered.

  • Be aware of the pending weather forecast in your region.
  • If the temperatures are going to be in excess of 75 – 80 degrees Fahrenheit for an extended period of time, consider expediting your shipment from ground delivery to overnight or 2-day, or “hold until safe” at final review. For “hold until safe” we will store your wine at no additional charge in our temperature controlled warehouse and ship it when the weather cools. You can also choose a delivery date up to six months out and we’ll store your wine free of charge until then. Think about the inside of your car at these elevated temperatures…that is what your wine is being exposed to in the back of a UPS/FedEx truck.
  • Once you’ve received your shipment it’s best to store your wine on its side, so the cork stays moist, in a cool dark place. If wine is kept too hot, or exposed to strong sunlight, it RAPIDLY deteriorates.
  • For bottles stored more than a few weeks at a time, the primary concern is to keep them from strong direct light, and to ensure that they do not reach extended periods of time at temperatures in excess of 77 degrees Fahrenheit, at which point the wine may be spoilt and forever afterwards taste cooked.

Does the Proper Wine Glass Matter?

YES IT DOES!!! I was very fortunate to be included in a private San Francisco Riedel Wine Glass tasting this week, which was led by 10th generation family member GEORG JOSEF RIEDEL.  I have always been a believer of drinking my wine out of proper glassware, but had never put the theory to test.  

There were about 75-100 of us participating, seated at long tables with three different sized/shaped empty wine glasses (Pinot – Hermitage – Cabernet/Bordeaux).  In front of each wine glass was a clear plastic 8oz glass, called a “joker,” each filled with 6 ounces of red wine.  There was also a bottle of still mineral water.  We began the tasting by pouring equal amounts of the water into each of the wine glasses.  Georg instructed us to drink the water out of glasses 1 – 3, and then asked us by a show of hands if we had a preference to any of the glasses with the water. 

Glass #1: Riedel Vinum XL (Pinot Noir)
Glass #2: Riedel Vinum XL (Syrah/Hermitage)
Glass #3: Riedel Vinum XL (Cabernet Sauvignon/Bordeaux)

I was surprised, and in total agreement with the majority, that the clear-cut favorite out of the 3 for drinking water was glass #3.  

Now it was on to the main event.  Georg instructed us to pour the wine from the plastic “joker” glass directly in front of glass #1 equally into glasses 1-3.  We were then instructed to twirl, smell, and taste the wine from glass #1, and repeat the same for the remaining 2 glasses.  Again, we were asked by a show of hands which glass was preferred for that particular wine.  Glass #1, the Riedel Vinum XL (Pinot Noir) was the overwhelming choice by a landslide.  The wine was revealed, and it was the beautiful 2008 Domain Drouhin Oregon Pinot Noir.  

Again we were asked to pour the contents of the “joker” glass in front of glass #2, equally into each of the three freshly rinsed wine glasses.  We repeated the exercise of twirling, smelling, and tasting.  The majority of the hands were raised for glass #2 Riedel Vinum XL (Syrah/Hermitage), with a small percentage for #1.  The second wine was revealed and it was the 2007 Neyers Syrah Hudson Vineyard.  The third wine poured was the 2008 Dominus Estate, and again by overwhelming majority glass #3 Riedel Vinum XL (Cabernet Sauvignon/Bordeaux) was selected as the favorite.  

Throughout the tasting Georg Riedel kept referring to the Cabernet glass, which is their top selling red wine glass by far, as a “troublemaker” and that the glass had “zero tolerance” for any wines other than those made with Bordeaux varietals.  This was made abundantly clear when tasting the 2007 Neyers Syrah Hudson Vineyard out of the Cabernet glass.  The beauty of the wine was completely lost in the Cabernet glass, and an extraordinary wine was made to taste very ordinary.  If you’re going to choose just 1 red wine glass…make it a Syrah/Hermitage glass, as this is the very best vessel compromise for all red wines. Why Shape Matters: 

  • Grape varietal specific stemware features finely-tuned glass bowls consisting of 3 variables:  shape, size, and rim diameter.
  • Grape varietal specific stemware has to translate the “message” of wine to the human senses.  There are 4 sensations of wine.   

Bouquet: Grape varietal specific stemware is responsible for wine aroma (quality and intensity)
Texture: Grape varietal specific stemware highlights the exciting variable mouth feel of wine (watery, creamy, silky, velvety).
Flavor:  Grape varietal specific stemware creates balanced interaction between fruit, minerality, acidity and bitter components.
Finish:  Grape varietal specific stemware offers a pleasant, seamless, harmonious, long lasting aftertaste.   

My  Riedel Wine Glass tasting takeaway: 

  • One glass is not ideal for all styles of wines, and wine’s bouquet, taste, balance and finish are all affected by the glass it is consumed from.
  • The same wine will display completely different characteristics when served in different glasses.
  • These differences can be so great, that even experienced wine connoisseurs believe that they are tasting as many different wines as there are glasses.
  • RIEDEL has created shapes that specifically enhance a wine’s harmony and highlight its unique characteristics.
  • Grape varietals carry unmistakable flavor profiles in their DNA, which add to the importance of selecting the appropriate glass.

The Forgotten Wine

I’ve often heard stories of places, magical places, beyond San Francisco where temperatures rise above 70 degrees for extended periods of time, known as seasons. I once had relatives visit from Michigan who packed nothing but shorts to wear, ignoring our warnings that San Francisco is not a very warm place and the weather is usually a crapshoot.

So when I imagine myself in warmer places, what am I drinking? It’s complicated. I could choose a white or sparkling wine but that’s too obvious, deep down I really want a nice chilled Rosé – she’s that pretty girl that no one asks to the school dance despite her killer moves. I forget about Rosé myself and get annoyed when I realize it.  Rosé has all the great red fruit and floral aromas we love about red wine and the bright acidity we love about white wines. A good Rosé will pair well with meat (especially pork) and seafood (move over Sauvignon Blanc) and mop the floor with many pasta dishes and Mexican dishes.

I can’t think of a single place in the wine world that doesn’t make Rosé. It is usually made using whatever the dominant red variety of the region is, like Syrah for Rhone Rosés, etc.  Rosés are usually made by either “bleeding” juice off from fermenting red wine, a technique known as Saignée, or by allowing only brief skin contact .  Cheap Rosés are made by mixing red and white wine – skip those.

Long story short, don’t forget about Rosé – she likes to boogie.

Shop Like a Pro!

It’s time to up your game and shop like a pro.  So here they are – a few tips to help you pick out the best of the best and, bottle by bottle, transform yourself into the oenophile your parents always suspected you’d become.    

Tip #1 Old to New

This first tip has very little application outside the wine world.  In fact, I discourage it for most other life scenarios, especially when shopping for milk or meat.  Find the oldest one on the shelf!  I always sort the 90 under $20 wine list by “Vintage:  Old to New.”  These lonely bottles are forgotten once newer, shinier bottles make their way onto the site.  That’s a shame because these wines are exactly what makes wine unique, they improve with age!  A little mellower, a little more complex, a little more integrated – a lot more interesting. 

Tip #2  What the heck is that!?

Txakolina? Try it, you’ll like it.  Lesser known varietals like Torrontes, Graciano, Godello, Txakolina, Falanghina and Mencia, may not be as popular as Chardonnay but, ounce for ounce, these wines are some of this category’s top performers.  Complex, affordable and, best of all, unlike anything you’ve tried before.  They are a great way to expand your palate and the breadth of descriptors you use to describe wine.  Do you want to see why people describe Torrontes as smelling like Juicy Fruit gum or experience what a truly high acid wine feels like?  Then try a bottle of Torrontes and Txakolina.  Best of all these wines will blow your world of wine pairings wide open.  So experiment.   After trying some of these you’ll be loath to plunk down twice as much money for a more popular varietal.

Tip #3  Swoop in for Savings

Sort by savings!  You can sort our 90 under $20 list by savings and order a few killer $30-$40 wines for under 20 bucks.  Not only will these wines give you the most for your money, but they typically also offer the most in terms of cellaring potential.  The higher price can be an indicator that, unlike a $10 bottle, it’s a keeper and the winemaker put an extra level of care into ensuring it will develop over the years. That $30 bottle of Pinot Noir with 93 points from PinotReport is good now, but will also be good in another 5 years and you got it for just $19.99!

I’ve shared some of my top picks and my best tips on finding wines, now I’m curious to know about your favorite 90 under $20 wines.

How to preserve or use leftover wine

As a member of the “empty bottle” club, leftover wine is rarely an issue in our household. However, there are times that a nice bottle goes unfinished and half (or more or less) of the bottle needs to be preserved for another time or put to use elsewhere.

If it’s a wine you want to save, there are a few ways to go about it. One of the most successful is one you may have not yet tried. Pour the remaining wine into a smaller container, such as a plastic or glass water bottle and seal it. Then place it in the fridge (even if the wine is red). The less oxygen/surface area ratio as well as the cooler temperature will help preserve the wine. If it is red, just take it out of the fridge an hour or so before planned consumption. The second option is the wine preserver spray, Private  Preserve, a container filled with inert, safe gas that, when sprayed into the wine bottle, blankets the wine and protects it from oxygen, the evil gas that can lead to a wine’s ruin. Just spray and re-cork and stick it in the fridge. Finally, there is the Vacuvin Vacuum wine saver. Though not the most effective, it is probably the most popular. This device sucks all the oxygen out of the bottle (or tries to) in order to protect the juice from ruin. If you do use this option, do stick it in the fridge for best results.

Sometimes a wine not only tastes different the next day (or two days later), it tastes downright bad. This is because oxygen, which can benefit a wine in small doses, is the element that puts wine on the path to becoming vinegar.  A wine starts to oxidize the minute it sees oxygen and the transformation can be quick or slow, depending on the wine.  Luckily, there are a couple of other ways to re-use this wine, other than pouring it down the drain.

– Make a marinade – While you can buy wine made for cooking, it’s usually best to use a wine that you’d actually drink. Most wine recipes cook-down a wine until the alcohol is gone and the flavors are concentrated, which is a perfect fit for leftover wine. Here are some great recipes from Real Simple magazine for using leftover wine.

– Turn it to vinegar – Though wine naturally, eventually turns to vinegar, it is a long process. The process can be sped up using a bacteria called “mother of vinegar,” which can be found at some random hardware or wine equipment stores. When you add “mother” to the old wine, it helps to speed up the process of vinegar transformation. After it’s done, you discard the “mother” and strain the vinegar. You can read a first hand account of how this works here.

If you’re not in the empty bottle club yet, hope you try one of the above suggestions to preserve or put your leftover wine to good use. Cheers!