Category Archives: Wine Recommendations

Celebrate International Italian Cuisine Day With Wine and Risotto!

Saturday, January 17th is International Italian Cuisine day. I thought we should blog about great food from the “old country”.  While there are tons of great Italian dishes out there, I have been craving that specialty of northern Italy, risotto.  Traditionally served as a first course, this creamy and delicious rice dish can work as a satisfying entrée.

Risotto can range in variety from the exotic Risotto Milanese, which is enriched with saffron, to light and delicate seafood riosotto, to the dark and dusky risotto al Barolo.  Regardless of the condiment or flavoring, great risotto begins with great rice. You need a short grain rice which is high in starch content.  Arborio or carnaroli varieties are readily available in most grocery stores.  It is well worth the effort to search for a specialty store that carries the vialone nano variety.

The next important trick to great risotto is mastering the method.  Instead of steaming, risotto is made by the timely addition of broth or water.  There are 2 tricks to this… First, make sure that the liquid and the cooking rice are at the same simmering temperature. Secondly, gently stir the liquid into the rice, and only stir as much as you need to. If the grains break, your risotto will become gummy and pasty.

Here is a base recipe and some ways to change it up:

Ingredients:

  • 5 cups homemade broth   OR   1 cup canned broth diluted with 4Ingredients cups water.  (I actually heat extra because it would be a disaster to be caught without enough cooking liquid.)
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons onion or shallot chopped very fine
  • 2 cups Arborio OR other imported Italian risotto rice
  • 1/2 heaping cup freshly grated parmigiano-reggiano cheese
  • Salt, to taste

 

Directions:

  1. In a sauce pan, bring the broth to a simmer. Make sure that it is close to the pan where you are making the risotto.
  2. Heat a heavy-bottomed sauté pan that has high sides (2” or so) and add the olive oil and 1 tablespoon of butter. Add the onion and cook gently until the onion is translucent.Making Risotto
  3. Add the rice to the sauté pan and stir gently so that all the grains are coated with the butter and oil.
  4. Now you will begin adding the broth from the sauce pan to the sauté pan one ladle at a time, stirring with a wooden spoon to make sure that the rice does not stick to the bottom of the pan.
  5. When the rice absorbs one ladle of broth, add another ladle of broth.  Repeat this process until the rice is tender but al dente. It should take about 20-25 minutes and the rice will look moist and creamy, not runny.
  6. When there is about a minute or 2 to go, add the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter.
  7. Remove the pan from heat and add all of the cheese, folding gently in order to even distribute.
  8. Transfer to a platter and serve immediately with additional shavings of parmigiano. Serves 6

Risotto Recipe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Variations:

White Truffle Risotto: Shave a half ounce of white truffle all over the top of the risotto right before serving. For those of us like me who are on a budget, you can always drizzle a bit of white truffle oil over the top.

Mushroom Risotto: In a separate pan, sauté about a pound of your favorite mushrooms in some butter and olive oil. I add a clove or 2 of garlic and some salt and pepper to taste. I deglaze the pan with a bit of wine and continue to cook until the mixture is dry. Before I add the butter and cheese to the risotto, I stir in about half of the mushroom mixture. I pour the finished risotto into a platter, top with the remaining mushrooms and chopped chives.

Butternut Squash Risotto: Cook and finely dice some butternut squash, about 2-3 cups. Instead of adding that last ladle of broth, add a ladle of heated heavy cream and fold in half of the squash. Finish the risotto with the butter and cheese. Top the finished risotto with the rest of the squash and some fried sage leaves.

 

Some WINES to try with these Risottos:

 

 

 

Just SOMME stuff I think about: Oregon

drouhinIt seems to me that Oregon Pinot Noir wines are becoming more and more popular everyday. Larger wine companies are taking interest and buying up properties that were once thought of as novelty. Foley Family Wines recently purchased the Four Graces Winery, following the in-roads that Kendall Jackson and Louis Jadot laid out with their recent purchases. And this got me thinking… what does anyone really know about the Willamette Valley in Oregon? The pioneers David Lett and Dick Erath blazed a trail and proved that amazing and long-lived wines could be made and grown there, but I doubt anyone really knows what any of this juice tastes like. One thing I’m always tasked with as a Sommelier, is telling people what different wines taste like in addition to what you should eat with them. So I am going to greatly generalize the Willamette Valley and the individual AVAs below, so that when confronted with a list you will be prepared to order a wine you love.

downloadDundee Hills:
Light ruby to cranberry in color with perfumed aromatics that will also include raspberry, black cherry and cola. The palate seems to have a sweet fruity core even though the wine is dry with spices, cola, earthiness and truffle.

Food Pairing: roasted porcini mushrooms and polenta

Sokol Blosser Dundee Hills Pinot Noir 2011

Yamhill-Carlton
Deep and dark ruby color with a rich, round mouth feel and silky tannins; this is a big wine. Big aromas of spices like anise or cloves then blackberries, blueberries, and roses. The palate will have the bramble fruit characteristics with espresso and clove developing into tobacco and cedar.

Food pairing: Roasted Duck Breast with berry glaze

Domaine Serene Yamhill Cuvee Pinot Noir 2011

Ribbon Ridge
The most age-worthy of all the wines but bordering on a rustic personality; this Pinot exhibits medium-plus to high acid, fine-grained tannins with a ton of earth and chocolate. What fruit you do find will be black cherries and plums.

Food Pairing: Chicken with Morels and Tarragon Cream Sauce

Bergstrom Silice Pinot Noir 2012

Chehalem Mountains
Due to high variance of soil and elevation this is a little harder to generalize but… they are either lighter and have a lot more red fruits like cherry and raspberry or dark cherries and dark plums. They all tend to have a lot earthy mushrooms and brown spices like allspice.

Food Pairing: Pasta with Mushroom Cream Sauce

Chehalem 3 Vineyard Pinot Noir 2012

Eola-Amity Hills
These are full-bodied Pinots yet very elegant and even feminine in nature. Bright red fruits like raspberry or cranberry with plums and dark cherries notably high in acid and minerality but with a good structure that brings balance. These wines tend to be the bright and fruity Pinots of the Willamette, with a spicy finish.

Food pairing: Cedar Planked Salmon

Evening Land Eola-Amity Hills Seven Springs Vineyard Pinot Noir 2011

McMinnville
These are the big boys on the block: the darkest in color and the most tannins, these wines tend to exhibit huge flavors of black fruits and earth. The fruits on the palate range from fig, cherry, mulberry, plum, olive or any combination thereof. The earthy components range from wet forest floor, mushrooms, truffles and dried leaves. Generally referred to as massive.

Food Pairing: Roasted Pork Loin with root vegetables

Brittan Basalt Block Pinot Noir 2010

Obviously, this doesn’t cover elevation, soil components or individual winemakers. Every wine is different from year to year, too. I only hope that this will serve as a rough guide to help you enjoy the world of Oregon Pinots from the Willamette Valley. Also: don’t forget the whites and Rosés!

 

 

Setting Wine Goals for the New Year

The end of December is a time for reflection on the year that has come and gone, as well as a way to set our sights on the brand new year before us. Many of us use this as a time to set goals for ourselves. Whether these goals are financial, fitness focused, or lifestyle in general, this period of our lives are beneficial towards cleansing us of the bad habits, ruts, and routines of the past, and helping us refocus our wishes, hopes, and desires for who we are as individuals.

Why not take this same outlook and apply it towards your wine journey? Take just a moment to reflect on where you’ve been and where you would like to take your wine journey from here. Are you new to wine but not quite sure where to begin? Are you eager to break yourself of your daily “go-to” Cab/Malbec/Pinot Grigio?  Are you a seasoned wine connoisseur who can speak proficiently on Burgundian wines, but feel like you are lacking perspective and knowledge of other up and coming wine regions?  What are your goals, wishes, and desires for this forthcoming year?

For me, I started my wine journey with focusing on Santa Barbara wines, as I had easy access to some great boutique wines from the region. I then moved on to being a world explorer of various new varietals and styles – whether it was a great Santorini from Greece, a Pinotage  from South Africa, or a Viognier from Australia.  For this coming year, I plan on settling my focus towards old world wines, an area where I am admittedly lacking.

How I anticipate expanding my knowledge is through research, tastings, and asking for advice from my colleagues. I look forward to picking their brains to learn more about what make a great Pinot Noir, Spanish Rioja , and Chablis.

But I am not the only one who can easily gain access to the wealth of knowledge that Wine.com’s experts are eager to provide. Whether it’s following Wilfred Wong’s reviews and communicating with him via Social Media, seeking out advice from Anne Pickett and Gwendolyn Osborn for recommendations via our latest online chat feature, exploring the Wine Notes blog for their deeper insights and first-hand experiences, or trying your hand at one of our 3 Wine Clubs  in an effort to expand your horizons, Wine.com provides a variety of tools and a wealth of information just at your fingertips.

So, I encourage you to set your sights on all that the future has in store for you. Don’t forget to set goals, and ask advice if you need help along the way. Happy New Year’s to all!!

The official wine for not over-cooking your Thanksgiving Turkey

Thanksgiving!

Full oven, crazy family, long day.

Whether you are navigating difficult in-laws or 9 dishes in the oven, you may be looking to that glass of wine.

Don’t fret, we have the wine for you – the one

Doctors_mediumthat will keep you sharp, yet let you sip.

Forrest Estate The Doctors’ Riesling 2012
THIS is the wine. Refreshing, zingy and… reasonable alcohol levels. Anyone else notice the rise in alcohol lately? Makes it hard to sip wine at noon when you’re cooking a turkey. This wine clocks in at a lovely 8.5%. And yet, no detectable residual sugar, just a delicious and refreshing wine that makes it easier to sip through the day.

The story of the Doctors from John Forrest is a great one. Forrest is, in fact, a doctor, who researched and studied and experimented with vineyard techniques to craft a lower alcohol wine. Rather than leaving residual sugar or reverting to reverse osmosis, Forrest avoids any winery intervention by utilizing a specific leaf removal  process in the vineyard. By achieving lower alcohol in the vineyard rather than the winery, Forrest does not have to sacrifice quality for the end result: a delicious, dry refreshing wine, with naturally low alcohol.

And so we have deemed this wine the official wine for NOT overcooking your Thanksgiving turkey. You may also deem it your ideal aperitif wine or perfect summer wine… we’ll leave it to you. Either way, you’ll feel okay about having that second glass :)

Cheers!

From Burgundy with love: Appellation Bourgogne

PicMonkey Collage

To most lonely and dedicated wine souls, Burgundy is the greatest challenge of all. One taste of a Montrachet or Romanée-Conti and one is doomed for a life of endless searching, and the painful reality of never-enough-money to even sniff wine’s Holy Grail. Even village wines cost more money than most mortals can spend. So it comes down to this: rare, ultra-expensive wines are often difficult to pronounce and harder to locate, even if one has reconciled the cost of the wine. It is no wonder that so many consumers have been chilled out of this precious wine region. Yet Burgundy, well aware of this situation, has begun to market wines that we all can afford.

Bourgogne Chardonnay and Bourgogne Pinot Noir is now the ticket back into Burgundy and provide the world with not just delicious and affordable wines, but wines that can be found in the marketplace. Wine experts freely admit that Burgundy is the birthplace of quality Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. While both varietals (more chard than pinot) are widely grown throughout the world, history and research always begin here. Bourgogne is now the appellation that delivers the flavors of the varietals, as well as the characteristics of Burgundy at an affordable price.

Over the last 20 years, I have been most impressed with Bouchard Père et Fils and how their continued growth to make better and better wines. The current 2012 Bourgogne Chardonnay and 2012 Bourgogne Pinot Noir are excellent representatives of this category and of these varietals. One doesn’t always have to break the bank to enjoy the wines from this land that stretches from Dijon to Lyon. This pair of wines are from Burgundy with love.