Category Archives: Wine Regions

The Albariño of Rías Baixas

As summer approaches, our minds dream up our next vacations; they take us to the café-lined streets of Paris, the sunny beaches of Bali, the snowy mountains of Mendoza…

For those of us who can’t exactly hop on a flight to our dream destination next week, certain wines – and their ability to reflect a distinct sense of place – can be the next best thing.  One example is Albariño from Rías Baixas, a white wine that almost tastes like sitting at the beach along Spain’s cool, misty northwest coast.

Rías Baixas is unlike anywhere else in Spain. The small coastal D.O. sits in the broader region of Galicia, also known as “Green Spain” due to its cool maritime climate and abundance of rain – a kind of oasis in a country known for its hot, dry summers.

This climate is a perfect match for Albariño, a thick-skinned grape variety native to the region. While there is plenty of rain in Rías Baixas, there is also ample sunlight, which allows Albariño to ripen and ultimately express notes of white peach, apricot, melon and honeysuckle. Still, the region’s cooling coastal influences produce wines that are light and elegant, chock-full of mouth-watering acidity. The wines often show a slight salinity, mirroring the cool, salty air in which their grapes thrive.

It is no surprise that Rías Baixas wines have burst onto the global wine stage, adored by trendy sommeliers and industry influencers. Comparable to some of the most renowned white wines in the world, Albariño from Rías Baixas offers exceptional value – you can get all the crisp acidity and minerality of a Chablis or a Sancerre for a fraction of the cost. The wine’s fresh style also makes it an ideal pairing with a wide range of foods, but it really shines with its region’s staple cuisine: seafood.

So, what are you waiting for? Pour a glass, grill some oysters, and take a mini-vacation at your dinner table.

 

Tempranillo – The Ultimate Grilling Wine

Located in the heart of Spain, Ribera del Duero is Tempranillo country. Thanks to a heady mix of cool nights and sizzling hot days, it’s the perfect climate for bringing out the best in the region’s bold style of Tempranillo.

Ribera del Duero – The Grape

Hands-down the Ribera del Duero’s shining star is the Tempranillo grape, known locally as Tinto Fino. The region’s rugged climate forces Tempranillo to ripen with thicker skins, more pigmentation and higher levels of acidity, which all translates to high-powered, meat-loving tannins, vibrant color pigments and incredible aromatic profiles in the glass. The wines of Ribera del Duero show an alluring mix of supple intensity and extreme food-pairing versatility.

Ribera del Duero – A Griller’s Delight!

When it comes to the best wines for grilled grub, red wines typically top the list. Wines that can handle smoked sausage, grilled steaks, poultry, pork and a kabob of seasonal veggies and assorted meat should carry their own balance of fruit, acidity and structure. Tempranillo brings all three key components to the grill and generously offers up exceptional food pairing partnerships.

  • Grilled Salmon: Tempranillo can also show its versatility in partnering up with the likes of grilled salmon, where the wine’s innate fruit character shows up bright as a backdrop against the variety of seasonings and marinades that often wrap themselves around a summery salmon filet. Serving tip: serve cool at around 55-60 degrees especially for lighter fare like salmon
  • Grilled Chicken: Whether slathered in barbecue sauce or simply seasoned with fresh herbs and a squeeze of lemon, grilled chicken is an easy pairing partner for Tempranillo’s earthy character and fruit forward (often black cherry and strawberry) nature.
  • Grilled Pork: From tenderloin to pork chops, Tempranillo is a master pairing partner with all things pork. Maybe it’s the traditional pairing roots of Jamón ibérico or maybe it’s that Ribera del Duero’s higher acidity cuts through the dry spice rubs and always handy barbecue sauces with familiar ease, either way Tempranillo is a no-brainer for pork themes whether grilled, slow cooked or cured.
  • Steak, Burgers and Brats: Ribera del Duero’s full-throttle tannins can make it a steak lover’s dream. The wine’s tannin astringency is easily tamed by the steaks fatty components and the flavors of both are deliciously elevated. Tempranillo also carries its own smoky character, thanks to oak’s happy influence, which gives it an edge to serving with a wide range of smoked, grilled and cured meats.
  • Veggies? Yes! Don’t let the “red wine with meat” myth steer you away from the grilling adventure of salt and pepper veggie kabobs. Tempranillo is one of the most versatile reds around. Sometimes Tempranillo comes across like a spicy Pinot Noir. The wine’s herbal, earth-driven character can make it an unforgettable partner for the concentrated, sweet flavors of lightly charred veggies.
  • Solo: We aren’t the only ones that like to sip a glass while turning steaks on the barbie. A glass of Tempranillo while pulling grill patrol is the perfect way to get the party started.

Ribera del Duero’s Tempranillo promises loads of blackberry, black cherry and blueberry fruit in tandem with an earthy mineral-driven, tobacco-induced flavor profile. Full throttle fruit and integrated structure, along with Tempranillo’s sassy style and versatile pairing nature make it a top pick wine for serving with a wide variety of grilled fare this summer.

Want to give Tempranillo a go with the grill? Check these out:

 

 

The perfect match: New Zealand and Sauvignon Blanc

While many regions produce incredible and delicious Sauvignon Blanc, and while New Zealand produces a myriad of top-quality varietals, there is no combination quite like Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand.

New Zealand arrived on the international wine scene in 1979 — not long ago, even by New World standards — when Montana Wine Company produced its first Sauvignon Blanc from Marlborough vineyards. Over the next decade, the country’s reputation transformed from “small island near Australia” to “wine-producing powerhouse.”

Sauvignon Blanc took over a larger proportion of New Zealand’s production in the 1980s, when a wine glut led to government-ordered vine-pulling. In response, most wineries pulled out the less noble varietals Muller-Thurgau and Chenin Blanc. That same decade saw a Phylloxera outbreak that led to re-plantings of Sauvignon Blanc on Phylloxera-resistant rootstock.

In 1985, Cloudy Bay launched its Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc in that distinctive style we now associate with most New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc. This wine burst onto the global stage and arguably put New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc on the world wine map.

So, what is it about New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc that has consumers ditching their by-the-glass Pinot Grigios? First, the style is distinctive. For new and experienced wine drinkers alike, there is something to be said about intense aromatics. New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc offers a consistent bouquet of lime, grapefruit, cut grass, herbaceous undertones and a touch of bell pepper. It’s immensely appealing, refreshing and memorable. People describe it unlike any other wine – zesty, prickly, feisty, electric, zingy… descriptors that make your taste buds wake up and sing!

As we move through spring and into summer, New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc will certainly be a staple in my fridge and a go-to for pool parties and summer-evening soirees.

3 reasons you should drink Rueda wine all summer

As the heat rises, so does our need for refreshment.

Do you typically reach for a Sauvignon Blanc or Pinot Grigio? This summer will be different. Here is why you should be drinking the delightful  white wines of Rueda all season (and beyond)!

  1. They are refreshing
    Wines of Rueda are made with the Verdejo grape, Spain’s most popular white wine variety.  It produces wines chock-full of acidity, giving you that zing you need in warmer months.
  2. They offer complexity
    Beyond the lively acidity, Rueda wines are aromatic, with layers of tropical fruit and citrus. With each sip you’ll notice its deceptively voluminous texture.  This magical combination makes it an ideal pairing for salads, appetizers, shellfish, roast poultry and anything with a bit of butter. I also like to pair it with a patio chair and friends.
  3. You can’t beat the value
    The easy-sippers start at $10, while you can find more complex wines at $17, and some of the top wines offer their balanced elegance at $25.  Every price point delivers the same classic flavors and characters of the Verdejo grape, but the higher-end wines can be kept a good 5 or 6 years before they start to shine.

Our favorites include:

Torres Verdeo Verdejo 2015 – I buy this one by the case – crisp citrus dominates and it’s just too easy to drink.
Finca Montepedroso Verdejo 2014 – like eating a tropical fruit salad on fresh-cut grass. Delightful texture and length.
Menade Nosso Verdejo 2016 – you don’t need to drink this immediately, as it will evolve with age. It’s fresh and lively now, but will increase in complexity and character over the next few years.

 

Washington Wine: A Journey Just Beginning

Washington State wine is a journey just beginning, but what milestones it has already passed! Barely a half-century since viticulture began in earnest, following Dr Walter Clore’s mapping of the Columbia Valley’s likely sites, the state has become the second-largest premium wine producer in the US and made its mark with grapes as diverse as Riesling, Grenache, and Cabernet Sauvignon, impressing with the quality and variety of its value wines, and culminating in the great reds which rival the best in the world.  The generous contours of the Columbia Valley AVA, which at 8.8 million acres covers a third of the state, hint at the ambition of the endeavor, as well as the adventures in terroir still to come; the relatively small area planted to vines (around 55,000 acres, slightly less than Burgundy) tell us the exploration has only just begun.

As with all great wine regions, the work (so to speak) began long ago, with the uplift of the Cascade Range and the periodic catastrophic flooding from the great Ice-Age lakes, Missoula and Columbia, which swept out a massive basin between the Cascades and Sierra Nevada and filled the valley with loess, clay, loam, and fine dry silt over a deeply eroded basalt foundation. In the rain shadow of the Cascades, the region’s semi-desert weather sports 300 days of sunshine and balances the extremes so paradoxically friendly to good wine. The northernmost of US wine regions, it enjoys sixteen hours of sun a day at the Solstice, while in the dry desert air the diurnal temperature swings unimpeded through forty degrees, imparting complexity and preserving acidity.

Dry and pristine as it is, with little fungal threat to the vines and a sandy, loose soil distasteful to the phylloxera louse, abundant aquifers and the great rivers give Washington’s growers water in need. Low disease pressure makes organic and biodynamic farming attractive, while the own-rooted vines dig deep in the poor, well-drained soil for their sustenance. Rewarding such keen attention, grown in a mélange of soil types, slopes, aspects, air currents and elevations, its vines flourish under the hand of the people living on the land, making wine from the produce of their vines, and the family winery has defined winemaking in Washington since its inception.

From these unfettered, well-tended vines spring true wines of place: pure and classic, with the richness of fruit characteristic of US wines but structured like no other, encompassing equally fruit and tannin, earth and acidity, filling all corners of the palate. Broad vineyards give quality grapes in such quantity that Washington’s value wines are a byword, while the nooks of the Wahluke Slopes, Red Mountain, and the Columbia Gorge (among other places) provide ample room to the winemaker drawn to seek the highest vinous expression.

Won’t you come along with us? It can only get better.