Category Archives: Gruner Veltliner

Gruner Veltliner
(GREW-nuhr Felt-LEEN-ehr)

The name may be intimidating but the grape is nothing but. This variety is increasing in popularity as more people discover its delicious qualities. Most wines made from Gruner Veltliner are from Austria, where it’s the most planted grape variety. Gruner means green in German, not because the grape is green, but because its used to create fresh wines that are best drunk young.

Notable Facts
A wine made from Gruner Veltliner typically has a perfumed nose, with hints of peach and other citrus and, most notably, hints of white pepper – white pepper is usually what distinguishes Gruner Veltliner best. Wines from this grape are typically dry with high acidity. It’s generally light to medium bodied but can be made in a richer, full-bodied style. The wines of Gruner Veltliner are high in acid and extremely versatile with food. Some winemakers in Austria are making sweet wines with the grape as well.

Successful Wine Region:
Austria

Common Descriptors:
white pepper, tropical fruits, minerals, green beans

Wine Pairing Strategies for Thai and Sushi

Let’s face it Asian fare is downright delicious, but it can be tricky to find solid wine pairing partnerships given the dynamic fusion of flavors, spices and otherwise exotic ingredients. In general, spicy themes beg for a wine that tames the heat with a touch of sweet (think German Riesling and off-dry Gewurztraminer). So, wines that carry higher levels of alcohol and lean heavily into oak, tend to overwhelm many of the innate flavors of Thai and sushi finds.

Wine Pairing: Thai

From super savory to feel-the-heat spicy green curries and creamy coconut milk textures to the full-on fusion of sour, sweet, salty and bitter found in your favorite Pad Thai, there is plenty of variety and culinary innovation busting out of most modern Thai dishes. When it comes to partnering up a wine, there are several things to consider.

  1. Sweet tames heat: for super spicy dishes, grab a wine that carries its own dash of residual sugar. This bit of sweet puts out the flames of hot red and green chili peppers quite well and fans the flames of flavor integration. German Rieslings at 9% abv or less are no-brainers for spicier curries.
  2. Bold flavors beg for less bold wines: Austria’s groovy Gruner Vetliner delivers savory flavors all wrapped up in rich fruit that won’t compete with the bolder flavors, but lighter weight of shrimp Pad Thai or more mild curries.
  3. Acidity is a good thing: when you’ve got moderate protein, a mix of funky flavors and exotic aromas and typically a starch base of noodles or rice, wines that deliver a dose of zesty acidity tend to highlight the flavors and carry the dish with added dimension.

 Quick Pairing Picks:

Wine Pairing: Sushi

Salty seaweed, wasabi, pickled ginger and raw fish. Not one of the easier pairings by any standards, but fully capable of showing fantastic potential with a handful of wine styles. As you increase the spice component, you want to decrease the alcohol levels or the alcohol will just amplify the heat and douse the flavors. For super versatile, tried and true pairings, you can rarely go wrong with off-dry Gewurztraminer or German Riesling (again). However, for more detailed menu matching, sometimes it’s easier to start with the protein for pairing. Let’s check in on wines for these ultra-popular rolls.

  • Crab Roll: The basic crab roll is picture perfect for pairing with an Alsatian Gewurztraminer or classic German Riesling, both teaming with mouth-watering acidity and forward fruit. These wines promise to play extremely well with the crab, cucumber and avocado that typically pack themselves into your everyday crab roll. Want to turn it up a notch? Give it a go with an off-dry Vouvray, based on the Chenin Blanc grape, that brings zippy acidity, round textures and lots of minerality that plays off the briny character of the crab meat.
  • Spicy Tuna Roll: The extroverted flavors and palate weight of the traditional spicy tuna roll call for a wine that shares many of the same characteristics. Enter Viognier. Highly aromatic, showing plenty of apricot and honeysuckle on the nose with more on display on the palate, Viognier echoes many of the characteristics of the roll itself – fresh, fuller bodied, complicated, versatile with rich silky textures.
  • California Roll: Avocado, cucumber and crab. Does it get any better than that? Well, with sushi, yes…often it does! But, the basic California roll is still loved by young and old alike, it’s a great introduction to all things sushi and provides a snappy pairing with everything from Alsatian Rieslings with their drier styles or the often herbaceous, topped with sunny citrus New World Sauvignon Blanc.
  • Tempura Shrimp Roll: The crispy, fried textures of the tempura make sparkling wines and Champagne a must-have glass for cutting through the yummy, fatty flavor profiles of your basic tempura shrimp roll.
  • Salmon Roll: Most salmon rolls show well with sparkling and still roses. The sparkling roses promise to cut through the fatty textures and clean the palate in one fell swoop.
  • Eel Roll (aka: Unagi or Dragon Roll): Earthy and briny, eel rolls work exceptionally well with the full-throttle aromatics and slightly sweeter side of Gewurztraminer, as does the snazzy, sweet, soy-based Unagi sauce that usually accompanies the roll.

 Quick Pairing Picks:

 

Six White Wine Grapes that Welcome Summer!

While the summer season doesn’t “officially” kick off until June 21, the lively white wines of summer have been ready to welcome patio pours for months. It’s easy to find your favorite grape, region or producer and keep drinking from the same well all season long, but when it’s time to shake it up and sip “out of bounds,” making new vinous acquaintances with less familiar grapes or regions, we are thrilled to help make those tasty introductions. From the sassy citrus vibe of Spanish Albarino to the herbal tang of Vermentino, there’s a summer white wine adventure just waiting to happen.

Spanish Whites: Albarino and Verdejo

Albarino – Delivering a zesty squeeze of citrus and a dash of salinity in virtually every bottle, Albarino, Spain’s white wine diva, is like sunshine in a glass. Albarino is picture perfect for patio sipping and even better when partnered up with the wine’s hometown culinary heroes like the fresh Galician Country seafood themes of oysters, clams, crab, hake and sea bass or octopus served with white potatoes olive oil and smoked paprika.  These versatile, dry white wines deliver incredibly fresh aromatics, with unmistakable acidity and equally friendly price points. Albarino hails from Spain’s northwest corner known as the region of Rias Baixas (pronounced “Ree-yahs By-Shuss”) where the maritime climate exerts a remarkable influence on the wines and the vines. Most Albarino vines are planted within miles of the coast earning the regional wines the enticing nickname of the “wine of the sea.” Ranging from steely, mineral driven bottles to wines with creamy textures, fuller-bodies, and a bit of butter on the finish (thanks for extended lees aging), Albarino showcases a wide range of palate appeal.

Must Try Albarino Producers:  Burgans, Martin Codax, Pazo Cilleiro, Pazo de BarrantesTerras GaudaLa Cana 

Verdejo – While Albarino comes from Spain’s northwest coastal corner just above Portugal, Verdejo hails from the continental climate, gravelly-soil and higher elevations of Rueda a well-known wine growing region situated about 100 miles northwest of Madrid. Though historically speaking, the grape can be traced back to the 11th century with deep roots in North Africa. In terms of style and structure, Verdejo is traditionally made in a clean, crisp palate style, though plenty of exceptions and experimentation occurs with both barrel aging and extended lees contact resulting in richer, more complex options as well.  These fuller-bodied bottles tend to lean heavily into the exotic flavor profiles of melon and citrus, with a noticeable minerality and almost always a touch of earthy, herbal nuances in the mix.

Must Try Verdejo Producers: Finca Montepedroso, Garciarevalo, Jose Pariente, Martinsancho, Protos

Torrontes

Argentina’s incredibly aromatic white wine wonder, Torrontes offers top notch value (generally in the $10-15 range), prides itself on being remarkably food-friendly and generally carries a medium to full body. Expect a decent dose of mouth-watering acidity (thanks in part to high elevation vineyards), a bone-dry palate style and a heady mix of floral (often rose petal) nuances mixed with rambunctious stone, citrus and apple fruit character. Best bets for food pairings are shellfish, grilled poultry, all sorts of Asian themes with Thai dishes being a personal favorite and even a bit of Tex-Mex with guacamole. Torrontes’ aromas offer up some of the wine world’s best perfumes – sweet, floral and incredibly fresh!

Must Try Torrontes Producers:  Amalaya, Alamos, Alta Vista, Kaiken, Crios de Susana Balbo, Zuccardi

Gruner Veltliner 

Gruner Veltliner (“Groo-ner Felt-lean-er”), Austria’s vinous claim to snappy white wine fame, and as such the region’s cooler growing conditions promise a crisp, high acid, exceptionally food-friendly wine experience. Easily enjoyed as an aperitif and welcoming all sorts of tricky-to-pair foods (think asparagus, artichokes, onions, olives and such), most of Austria’s Gruner Veltliner hails from the regions of Wachau, Kampstal and Kremstal with considerable influence from the Danube River.

Similar to Albarino, Gruner Veltliner tends to see little oak influence overall, but relies on stainless steel tanks to retain the bright fruit character (mainly citrus, apple, melon and apricot or peach and sometimes a funky green bean flare) alongside a zippy acid profile.

 Must Try Gruner Veltliner Producers:  Domaine WachauGroonerLoimer, Markus Huber

Sauvignon Blanc

While admittedly not an “out of the ordinary” summer grape variety, no summer white wine list should be without the ultra versatile, equally able to thrive in Old World and New World regions and extraordinarily affectionate towards food wine, known and loved as Sauvignon Blanc. This highly versatile grape manifests itself in a variety of styles under the umbrella of white Bordeaux, from light, crisp and fruity to rich, complex and creamy, its expressive aromas rely largely on the Sauvignon Blanc grape, but keep in mind Bordeaux Blanc often marries the complementary low acid, full-bodied textures of Semillon as part of the region’s savvy blend. Looking for a loud, lively and happily extroverted version of Sauvignon Blanc?  Discover it in the exuberant, citrus-infused smile found in the snappy acidity of New Zealand’s favorite white wine grape, Sauvignon Blanc is your “go to” girl when it comes to the smells and tastes of summer. Enjoying a range of styles and growing regions, Sauvignon Blanc’s adaptability, reasonable pricing structure, and overall pairing versatility make it an easy stop on the summer wine train.

Must Try Sauvignon Blanc Producers: Chateau Malartic-LagraviereChateau Marjosse, Clos des Lunes, Craggy Range, Dog Point, Ferrari-Carano, NobiloRobert Mondavi

Vermentino

The clear majority of Italy’s Vermentino hails from the large Mediterranean Island of Sardinia, with the best quality coming from the rugged, granite soils of the northeast quadrant of the island called “Vermentino di Gallura DOCG,” which requires a minimum of 95% Vermentino in the bottle. These high acid wines are fermented to a completely dry style and carry a medium to fuller body in general. In terms of flavors and aromas, earthy, herbal undertones set a distinguishing backdrop for subtler citrus, green apple, and pear fruit character. The herbal influences make Vermentino a top pick for pairing with fresh pesto, vegan dishes, seafood and a number of summer salads.

Must Try Vermentino Producers: JankaraPoggio al Tesoro, SantadiSella & Mosca

 

Austrian Wines- Grüner takes a Chardonnay Spin?

14_09_22 1300 Franz Leth@Anchor & Hope_3930_Blog

It was some time ago (circa 2003), in a dark place when I tasted my first Grüner. I had no idea (well maybe a little) of what this unusual white wine was about. Where was I? In some San Francisco Bay Area wine bar with a couple of somm friends as I recall. So what is it about Grüner that drives us wine folks crazy? The wine generally comes in a hock bottle, with its German and low-alcohol history, but the Austrian white wines are far different from their German counterparts. Can we talk Chardonnay here? I was reminded of this when I posed a Facebook question and my friend Alison Smith Story of Story Wine Cellars brought this notion to my attention. I never could understand completely why Grüner Veltliner was so appealing but I did enjoy the wine’s fatness without the aid of oak or residual sugar. I am now thinking, could there be a similarity between Grüner Veltliner and un-oaked Chardonnay. Continue reading Austrian Wines- Grüner takes a Chardonnay Spin?