Category Archives: Rosé

Riding out Summer with Regional Rosé

Whether it’s rosé (France), rosato (Italy), rosado (Spain), Tavel (Rhone Valley) or simply “blush wine” – these region-specific wine terms point unashamedly to pink wine. Rosé wines are the rising stars and delightful chameleons of the wine industry. Ranging in color from hot pink to salmon and copper to pale blush, there are countless shades running from soft and subtle to loud and proud depending on which grapes were utilized and how long the grape skins were in contact with the juice. Happily, the versatile nature of rosé wines doesn’t stop there! Rosés also come in a wide range of styles: sweet, off-dry or bone dry with most Mediterranean sources of distinct rosés being decidedly dry.

Rosé Wine: Color and Character

Rosé wines are essentially red wine grapes in summer suits. Most rosés are derived solely from red grape varieties (though some producers blend red and white wine together to find their perfect pink). During a brief encounter with grape skins, the must (juice) takes on more subtle color variations; however, the longer the contact time the more vibrant the pink hues tend to become. Shades of pink are also significantly influenced by the type of grapes used for the specific rosé wine. Typically, the thicker the grapes’ skins, the more vibrant color pigments they can offer a vat of must.

Which Grapes Reign Pink?

The most popular grapes for initiating a bottle of rosé are Syrah, Grenache, Cinsault, Mouvedre, Merlot, Malbec, Zinfandel, Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, Tempranillo, and Sangiovese. These grape varieties may either be used solo or in a synergistic blend, with many regional rosé offerings basing their grape picks on the more prolific red wine varieties found in each growing zone. For example, many of Italy’s rosatos are founded on the popular Tuscan grape, Sangiovese. Likewise, Spain’s rosados find firm footing with the high-profile Tempranillo or Garnacha grapes coming out of the Rioja region.

Rosé Wine Flavors and More

Typically delivering more body than a white wine, but lacking the tannic grip of a dry red, rosé wines tend to be more subtle versions of their red wine counterparts. The fruit character steers toward red berry profiles with strawberry, cherry, and raspberry along with significant citrus and watermelon debuting on a regular basis. Rosés enjoy a happy range of palate profiles, running from completely dry to fairly fruity and sometimes sweet, depending on the region and producer. If you prefer dry and exceptionally food-friendly wine? Then scout for Mediterranean rosés from southern France, Spain or Italy.

Rosé: Food Pairings

While often enjoyed as an engaging aperitif, rosés are remarkably adept at pairing with a wide range of regional foodie finds. Generally carrying higher levels of mouth-watering acidity, these pink drinks are easy pairing partners. From the quintessential Mediterranean cuisine of fresh fish and signature tapas to summer salads, shellfish or the smoky fare of South American entrees and carrying on quite well with the burgers, brats and pub grub of many American treats, well-chilled rosés promise to be one of the most adaptable wine pairing picks around.

Where to Drink Pink: Regional Recommendations

 

 

 

Discover Rhone

Feeling a pull to step out of your comfort zone with the wines you normally drink? Well whatever those may be, a spectacular place to start a new voyage is in the southern part of the Rhone River Valley!

If you don’t have the resources to jump head first into the reigning region of Chateauneuf-du-Pape, whose silky and alluring wines command a higher, though well-deserved price, the next best way to discover Rhone is to venture out into its satellite regions. Unlike many other wine growing regions of the world, the span of high quality vineyards of the Rhone extends far beyond its heart, in this case, the historical region of Chateauneuf. In the Rhone, the satellite regions are where you will find not just some of the very best values, but also quite a heap of hidden gems. Continue reading Discover Rhone

Provence: The Prescription for your Pink Wine Phobia

Do you suffer from a crippling fear of rose-tinted wines? Do you wander the aisles of the wine shop, shielding your eyes from bottles filled with cheerful pink liquid? Do you find yourself frustrated on a hot summer day when a glass of room-temperature red is insufficiently refreshing yet white seems insubstantial for pairing with your barbecued fare? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, you may be suffering from a debilitating condition known in the oenophile community as “roséphobia.” If you or a loved one is suffering from this disorder, do not despair—hope is on the horizon.

The most effective treatment to combat roséphobia is exposure therapy. Many sufferers are simply unaware of the breadth and depth of styles of rosé wine available on the market, especially those who are traumatized by flashbacks of saccharine Mateus and other similar products popular in the second half of the 20th century. However, these distressing memories can quickly become a thing of the past through the discovery of dry, high-quality rosés, particularly those hailing from the Provence region of southeastern France. This treatment may be administered under the counsel of a skilled professional, but roséphobics may also explore these wines on their own, taking comfort in the knowledge that just about any bottle is a safe bet. Continue reading Provence: The Prescription for your Pink Wine Phobia

Somm Things I Think About: Portugal’s still wines

Portugal has built its reputation on fortified wines and for hundreds of years, Port and Portugal have been synonymous. But too often overlooked are the still, dry wines of the country. With over 250 indigenous varieties, different climates, soils and with sustainable practices, Portugal is an untapped haven for still wines. They are incredibly food friendly, and have every price range and style imaginable.

Wine making in Portugal pre-dates the Phoenicians, Greeks, and Romans. In fact, they have been making wines for over 4,000 years. This independence and isolation has lead to indigenous grapes not found elsewhere in the world, save a couple shared with Spain (Alvarinho=albarino, and Tinto Roriz=Tempranillo).

Continue reading Somm Things I Think About: Portugal’s still wines

#DrinkPink! Rose season is here

Rose, rosado, rosato, vin gris, blush… whatever you choose to call it, it’s the season for drinking pink.  Like seeing the world through rose-colored glasses, we enjoy seeing the summer through a rose-colored wine glass.

drinkpinksingleWhile rose is delightful year round, it is especially popular during the summer months. Perhaps the image of sipping Provence rose on the Mediterranean beaches comes into play, but most likely it’s because rose is refreshing, unique and an ideal wine for aperitifs, picnics, BBQs and just about everything else going on in the summer.

Continue reading #DrinkPink! Rose season is here