Category Archives: Red Varietals

Garnacha is the New Black

In a way, a wine cellar is kind of like a wardrobe. You have your sparkly Champagne for special occasions, your comfortable Cabernet for when you need something familiar and reliable, and that dusty old bottle in the back that no longer fits your taste but you just can’t bring yourself to throw away. You might favor one color over all others, or perhaps you have a balanced mix. Maybe you have a favorite brand, or a particular appreciation for fine Italian craftsmanship. Whatever your wardrobe or cellar preferences, it is important to have a few versatile pieces that can work for any occasion.

Garnacha, a grape variety native to Spain and known as Grenache in France and elsewhere, may be just the thing you need to round out your wine rack—but don’t call it basic. Garnacha can be found in red, white and rosé varieties, and can range from dry but fruity table wines to jammy, sweet dessert wines that bear a close resemblance to Port. Continue reading Garnacha is the New Black

Grab Some Garnacha for #GarnachaDay 2016

Meet Garnacha. Serving diligently as one of Spain’s signature red wine grape varieties, Garnacha enjoys extensive plantings worldwide. This hardy, thin-skinned, late ripening red grape is thought by many to have originated in the landlocked region of Aragon in northeastern Spain. Because it can handle the demands of crazy continental climates like a champ, with vines withstanding wind and drought conditions considerably well, Garnacha (aka Grenache in France), is a go-to grape for all sorts of winemaking endeavors. Just to keep things interesting, Garnacha also comes as a rich, full-bodied white wine variety, dubbed appropriately as “Garnacha Blanca.”

From world class rosés to concentrated collectibles and fortified favorites, and routinely bottled as a key contributor in synergistic blends or flying solo as a single variety, Garnacha brings plenty of vinous charm and outright versatility to the winemaker’s cellar. After all, what other grape variety can lay creative claim to red, white, and rosé, dry, off-dry, and sweet, fortified along with sparkling wine renditions? Continue reading Grab Some Garnacha for #GarnachaDay 2016

The Next Great Grape: Garnacha From Cariñena

At times, it can be a little bit tricky to keep up with the world of wine. Ancient grapes like Saperavi and Trousseau cycle back into fashion just as quickly as brand new regions are planted with vines. Learning about wine can sometimes feel a bit like waiting in line at Disneyland—once you’ve made it through the room of Cabernet, Pinot, and Chardonnay, you turn the corner and there’s a whole other room filled with obscure varieties and appellations to learn. In fact, the more you learn about wine, the more you realize there is still left to learn!

To help you stay ahead of the curve, we’ve done our homework on one of Spain’s most exciting up-and-coming regions. It’s still under the radar, so even your wine-loving friends will be impressed by your discovery. Continue reading The Next Great Grape: Garnacha From Cariñena

Memoirs of a Malbec

malbecSometimes I feel like nobody really knows the real “me.” Ever since I moved to Argentina, I’ve been fitting in really well. In fact, I’m probably the most popular guy here. I’m having a great time laying out in the warm sun all day, enjoying the dry heat — I barely even have to worry about fungal disease these days! And at night, when it cools down, I can rest easy knowing that I’m ripening nice and evenly. When I’m at high altitude, it can be a bit of a challenge to get the nutrition that I need to thrive, but ultimately my hard work pays off as I develop more complexity. The laid-back, easygoing lifestyle here has made me soft and approachable, and I tend to get along with everyone I meet. But a part of me worries that I might soon forget where I came from.

You see, life wasn’t always so easy for me. I grew up in the drained swampland of Bordeaux, where I began life as a very small fish in a big pond. There, while constantly battling difficult weather conditions to avoid disease or death, I contributed color and tannin to local blends — but I was never the star of the show. It’s not so much that I need the attention — I’m just an outgoing guy. So after a devastating frost in 1956 during which I lost 75% of my crop, I decided to focus my energy on my second home in Cahors, just southwest of Bordeaux. There, I changed my name back to Côt, and alongside Merlot and Tannat, I began to shine, as I had been respectfully replanted by those who appreciated me. Meanwhile, back in Bordeaux, they decided they were better off without me, and these days you’ll rarely find me back in my former home town. I’m not bitter, I swear — really, I wish all the best to my old friends Petit Verdot, Merlot, and the brothers Cabernet. I know they talk behind my back about my susceptibility to coulure and downy mildew, and my lack of maturity in colder years — but if I have to be in a blend with them, I’ll be perfectly cordial.

I set down roots in Argentina back in 1868, when I was brought over by a French agricultural engineer who recognized my potential. Life was always comfortable there, but it wasn’t until the late 20th century that I “went viral,” effectively becoming the national grape of my adopted homeland. I’m happiest living in Mendoza, but I’ve made my way throughout the entire country. Wherever I go, I am always well-received by locals and foreigners alike!

When I’m in my native France, my personality is rather different. I guess you could say I live a more “rustic” lifestyle there — I’m not afraid to get a little dirty, and my tannins are a bit tougher. Probably because of the thicker skin I tried (and failed) to develop amidst the bullying in Bordeaux. Sometimes I like to vacation in the Loire Valley, where I can relax and let my aromatic side come out. But nowadays most people never get to see that side of me. I don’t want to brag, but thanks to my success in Argentina, I’ve become a bit of a world traveler. Apart from France and Argentina, I’m now planted in Chile, California, Oregon, Washington, Italy, New Zealand, South Africa, Australia, and a few other countries. Everywhere I go, people ask, “hey, aren’t you that guy from Argentina?” I’m very proud of my recent success, so I smile and say yes, and occasionally I’ll pose for a picture. But with each encounter, I think back to my humble beginnings and consider saying, “if you like me in Argentina, you should see me in France.”

South Africa: New Land of Vines

MeerlustOn a continent that typically brings to mind dry, hot deserts and rainforest jungles, it’s easy to forget that there is also wine. But on the very southern tip of South Africa, vineyards thrive and produce a wide variety of grapes. Though the wines were slow to market due to the embargo on South Africa during apartheid,  the country has managed to solidify its presence as a quality wine producer over the past few decades. As a huge fan of South African wines, I wanted to share a few tips on what to try!

Reds are smokey-meaty:
This is a good thing — fire up the grill! Something about the land in South Africa brings out a gamey character in red wines, like bacon fat or smoked meat, especially in Syrah. Continue reading South Africa: New Land of Vines