Category Archives: Wine Education

WINE (noun): the alcoholic fermented juice of fresh grapes used as a beverage

Source: Merriam-Webster

Is wine gluten free?

gluten freeOne health question that I get more than any other—besides whether or not a wine contains sulfites—is whether or not wine is gluten free. The short answer is that yes, it is. The production of wine is inherently gluten free as the raw materials involved are grapes, and there is no wheat used in the growing or fermentation process.

As far as the production process, the only place—theoretically—where gluten may be used is in fining. The best fining agents are animal based products, the most common being egg whites, but I couldn’t find any winemakers that use wheat gluten in this capacity.

In regard to the aging process, the heads of some wine barrels can be sealed with a wheat paste; however, wax alternatives have been found to be less expensive, and offer a better seal. Tricia Thompson, a dietician who specializes in gluten free products recently commissioned tests of a Cabernet Sauvignon and a Merlot. The results of the tests conducted on both wines came back showing fewer than 10ppm. According to the FDA, products that contain fewer than 20ppm are considered gluten free.

So, to sum up, for all intents and purposes there is no discernible gluten to be found in wine, making those who must or who choose to watch their gluten intake very happy!

*always check with your doctor as the final source of information.

The hunt for California’s Holy Grail

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You think you need to travel to The Mecca of Pinot Noir to satisfy your appetite for the variety? Well, I have news for all of you starving wine lovers. Though it is hard to deny that a week in Beaune, France would do wonders for the wine soul, I can point to so many places in California where Pinot Noir has gone to the next level. Where? Could it be the Russian River Valley, the Anderson Valley, Sonoma Coast? While those places do indeed have some of America’s very best Pinots, today I’d like to talk about the Santa Lucia Highlands. Continue reading The hunt for California’s Holy Grail

Kicking off California Wine Month with Zin!

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Though Zinfandel is often called the “California grape,” its origins are slightly further away. Where is origin of Zinfandel? In 2000, Carole Meredith, co-proprietor of Lagier-Meredith and American grape geneticist, published findings that suggested Croatia was the origin of this varietal.  Before this, many in the industry believed Zinfandel was possibly a descendant of Primitivo, the Southern Italian grape. It’s true that Zinfandel and Primitivo are related, but they are both clones of Crljenak,  a native variety of Croatia. Continue reading Kicking off California Wine Month with Zin!

#CabernetDay from Bordeaux to Coonawarra

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The journey to Cabernet Sauvignon can start anywhere. If you live in the United States, Cabernet is everywhere. Restaurants, retailers, a wine friend’s home, there is no shortage of this varietal. Cabernet is the red wine that runs the show. How did this one varietal become so dominating? Cabernet Sauvignon is a resilient grape that grows and prospers in many viticultural regions around the world. Historically it is a wine that has traveled well. When wines were first exported across the Atlantic to the United States, Bordeaux was one of the best survivors on the long and arduous journey.                                                                                                                                                                      Cabernet and Bordeaux: Bordeaux is one of the most classic wine regions in the world. Cabernet Sauvignon made its mark in the Médoc (Left Bank) region of Bordeaux, where it acts as the principal grape of the blend. Continue reading #CabernetDay from Bordeaux to Coonawarra

Aussie Wines Rocking My World

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What do we really know about Australia and the wines made there? Maybe less than we should! Not only is Australia a huge country (sixth largest in the world) but it’s also the source of some of the world’s most spectacular wines. If you still equate the country with large-production value Shiraz and not much else, it’s time to take a closer look.

I got a full immersion into the wide variety of Australian wines when I judged in the Sydney International Wine Competition in 2012. As one of three Americans, I was treated to an Australian wine education by the Aussies, Kiwis and Brits. I was just a bit surprised by the complex methods used at this judging. The organizers brought in a top level chef to create dishes to match the categories. We were asked to write complete thoughts as well as recordings of our findings on tape.  In addition to participating in an incredible  judging event, we enjoyed wines from the cellars of many of the participating judges.

In the last month I’ve had two exciting Australian wine encounters that rocked my world. First, Michael Twelftree – Proprietor & Managing Director of Two Hands Wines – visited the Wine.com offices. Listening to him as we tasted his wines was simply amazing. The intensity and passion he conveyed made the tasting an experience of a lifetime. I learned that Twelftree was very adamant about producing wines of integrity and elegance in order  to shed the preconception that Aussie wines are mostly big and brawny. Three weeks later, I attended a presentation by Sue Hodder – Senior Winemaker of Wynns Coonwarra Estates – and found the wines equally remarkable; they were wonderfully rich and well-balanced. Both winemakers had succeeded in convincing me that their country produces truly world class wines.

While Shiraz remains high on my charts of Australian wines, I am taking a new path and seriously looking at Cabernet Sauvignons. Two of my current favorites are the super-rich 2012 Two Hands Sexy Beast and the elegant yet persistent 2012 Wynns Coonawarra Estate Black Label Cabernet Sauvignon. Try either of these wines with a juicy steak and prepare to have your world rocked by Australia too!