Category Archives: What We’re Drinking

Merlot re-cap: why should we drink Merlot?

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Let’s take Merlot to the party. Whether it is a cast of thousands or just a party of two, Merlot has so much to offer. Let’s begin with a party. #MerlotMe brought us a renewed perspective on the grape. The wine is present yet clearly unobtrusive. Partakers belly up to the bar and say, “Pour me a red and fill-er-up.” In this case, they want a smooth red so that can back to the party. The 2011 Rodney Strong Sonoma County Merlot is one of the industry’s best for these occasions. As an affordable super-premium, the wine fulfills all the highpoints. Easy-to-drink, upscale and super food-friendly, I’ll have a full glass please.

How about for a party of two? Is there a perfect wine, now but I have one that is a no-brainer. Duckhorn Vineyards, one of the highest profiled ultra-premium producers of Merlot, has issued a super 2012 Napa Merlot. Richly layered and succulent, this one takes the varietal to another level. For cozier soirées, this top-of-the-line choice will please neophytes and sophisticates. The former will enjoy the wine that they may have recognized and latter will simply approve the selection.

Merlot grows well in many places of the wine world. On the Right-Bank of Bordeaux, in eastern Washington State, in many spots of the Napa Valley as well as in many other places, merlot takes its place as “The Wine” and while those special viticultural areas take care of the well-heeled crowd, there are even more places doing an excellent job of grown the varietal for everyday enjoyment. Merlot can supply wine drinkers with plenty of fine-drinking wines for a wide variety of occasions. So why do we drink merlot? We drink merlot because they are one of the most dependable reds on the planet.

Merlot: The “M” Wine

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Don’t look at me like that! Just because there is a big “M” on my chest does not mean that I am bad. I wanted to be pure and chaste and loved from afar, but you brought me to too many parties and there I was on a table. foils cut and uncorked. The servers poured me into big goblets and everyone drank me like I was nothing. Wineries through the decades planted me in low quality, high yielding vineyards just so they could make money of my vines. Can you imagine that? My daddy, Cabernet Franc, and my mother, Magdeleine Noire des Charentes, would never have approved. Or would they? Unfortunately it worked; everyone drank me like water and tossed the empties into the recycle bins.

There are over 600,000 acres of Merlot planted in the world. Most of it in France, a great deal in Italy, some in the United States, Australia, Chile and Argentina – I suppose there are Merlot plantings everywhere. Merlot is an important varietal. The grape provides plenty of soft, succulent red wine  that gives winemakers blending options to make their wines better. On the Left Bank of Bordeaux, a little bit of Merlot goes a long way and on the Right Bank, it is king (especially in Pomerol). Yes, I am proud to be Merlot.

October is Merlot month, and in that spirit I am tasting examples from all over the world. Follow the hashtag, #merlotme, on Twitter, and learn more about the excitement that is now surrounding the varietal. It is time to fill your shopping cart with Merlot, the “M” wine! Three of my favorites are: the 2012 Duckhorn Napa Valley, the 2011 Rodney Strong and the 2010 Twomey by Silver Oak. Now please look at me square in the eyes, I am ready to serve you. Your relationship with me may never be the same again.

#CabernetDay from Bordeaux to Coonawarra

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The journey to Cabernet Sauvignon can start anywhere. If you live in the United States, Cabernet is everywhere. Restaurants, retailers, a wine friend’s home, there is no shortage of this varietal. Cabernet is the red wine that runs the show. How did this one varietal become so dominating? Cabernet Sauvignon is a resilient grape that grows and prospers in many viticultural regions around the world. Historically it is a wine that has traveled well. When wines were first exported across the Atlantic to the United States, Bordeaux was one of the best survivors on the long and arduous journey.                                                                                                                                                                      Cabernet and Bordeaux: Bordeaux is one of the most classic wine regions in the world. Cabernet Sauvignon made its mark in the Médoc (Left Bank) region of Bordeaux, where it acts as the principal grape of the blend. Generally combined with Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot and sometimes Malbec, the ”Médoc blend” became the model of Cabernet Sauvignon blends throughout the world. Despite the imitation of the Cabernet-based Bordeaux blend, no Cabernet is quite like Bordeaux. And when vintners use its prized varietal in their own backyard, the results are diverse and distinct. A wonderful international varietal, Cabernet Sauvignon serves as a foundation to some of the world’s greatest wines. 

As far as one varietal, international wine drinkers can always count on Cabernet Sauvignon. I cut my teeth on California Cabernets (mostly from the Napa Valley) in the late 1960’s. Over the years I have found great examples from Walla Walla in Washington State, Sonoma Mountain, and even Livermore Valley. The Australians make great cabs from the Barossa Valley. I most recently re-discovered Coonawarra, an Australian region known for this varietal. That is the beauty and magic of Cabernet Sauvignon. It is resilient, prospers worldwide, and makes wines that even the most particular of wine lovers will enjoy.

Cabernet and Napa: Most recently, all attention has been on Napa, and rightly so. After the earthquake, wineries have been cleaning up the broken bottles, taking stock of lost wine and taking survey of the damage. Luckily there was no human loss in the quake, but it’s hard to say the same for Napa Valley’s most prized product: wine. As we celebrate Cabernet, the most planted grape in Napa Valley, we encourage you to pick up a glass of Cabernet (or any other varietal!) from Napa and toast your support. Tweet it, Instagram it, share it on Facebook. There’s no better time to #drinknapa! Cheers.

Baseball and Wine: The race to the pennant

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There is a saying every spring when it comes to the boys of summer: “Hope springs eternal.” Doubtful that 18th century English poet, Alex Pope, imagined that his words would be immortalized in baseball “hall of fame” expressions, but we hope he’d be proud. Baseball, the great American pastime, runs from the beginning of March to early October. Most teams have World Series dreams that begin early and  fade or grow as the season heads into the home stretch.

While many turn to beer and other beverages, more and more sports fans are taking the wine route as they root, root, root their teams to their pennant berths. I had a friend of mine, a San Francisco Giants fan, who always broke out a bottle of Sonoma County zinfandel for good luck. As the season came to its crescendo, she would go for the more expensive stuff. Baseball and wine, like any good match, goes together quite well. Here are my picks for the best wines with baseball that I will be pouring as my team heads into October.

I’d like to start with a bubbly, not too expensive but plenty good to whet the appetite and get the rooting lungs going. Just imagine watching the pre-game warm up with a glass of Domaine Chandon Brut from California. Elegant and tasteful, with sharp crisp acidity, this one would match well with sashimi, raw oysters, caviar and the like. Of course, one could just drink it by itself at the sound of the National Anthem. The first pitch is a strike. “What, the ump called it a ball!!!” Let the games begin. Real fans know that the first three innings are a dance between the pitchers and opposing lineups.  As more food comes to the buffet table,  I always make sure to have Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon on hand. You may say, “Wilfred, you are so boring.” Well, I just want to be pragmatic and if I don’t have these two on the back bar, someone will ask for them, I can guarantee that!

Dollars play a part in what I choose and this is the kind of event that I don’t really want to overspend.  Everyone will pour their beverages and plate their food with their eyes glued to the tube or, more likely, there will be a baseball argument of some sort. Food and wine play a supporting role here. My Chardonnay choice: The 2012 Veramonte Chardonnay from the cool Casablanca Valley in Chile. This wine is very good and quite affordable. You can even buy a few bottles extra, in case the game goes into extra innings. Cabernet needs to be easy to drink, yet definitive in its flavors. For this season I recommend the pert and clearly defined 2011 Penley Estate Cabernet Sauvignon from the Coonawarra area of Australia. Now get ready for the final leg of the pennant chase. May the best team win!

Jordan Cabernet Sauvignon: Elegant, Wonderful and Timeless

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My first cab? I think it was a mid-1960’s Beaulieu Vineyard Georges de Latour Private Reserve. My dad always enjoyed a glass of BV Georges on special occasions and somewhere around the age of 15 I must have taken a sip or two when he wasn’t looking. When I started drinking wine on my own, I discovered the 1968 BV Georges and the 1967 Heitz Martha’s Vineyard. Like all top wines of that era, they were elegant and stately. Over the next three decades California  ratcheted up of the power in this varietal. By the mid 1990’s, California Cabernet Sauvignon had evolved into monsters of the midway. Decidedly full bodied and tannic, they commanded attention and could overpower meals they were supposed to support.  Only the finest producers knew how to tame the new-age Cabernet Sauvignon, which leads me to Jordan Vineyards & Winery.
The winery comments, “When the first vintage (1976) of Jordan Cabernet Sauvignon debuted, it was an immediate success due to its elegance and early approachability, as well as its affinity for food.” As a retailer in San Francisco, I saw the first-hand reactions by my customers as they told me how much they loved this wine. The winery knew the style of wine that this area was destined to make and never wavered in their efforts to be true. While some wineries went bigger and bigger, Jordan maintained its balance. This is why I have always been a big fan of the Jordan Cabernets.

In a recent staff tasting at Wine.com, I poured the 2010 Jordan Cabernet Sauvignon. I found the wine elegant and full of finely-tuned red fruit aromas and flavors. Aside from breaking the wine down into its components, the most important aspect of the wine was its completeness. It was not imposing or over-the-top. Isn’t providing pleasure one of the goals of a wine? As with this moment in time, I have never poured a Jordan Cabernet that was not appreciated by all. I had been drinking California Cabernet for more than a decade before the 1976 debuted in 1980, and while it may not have been my first Cabernet, it is what I am drinking and serving as often as I can. The Jordan Cabernet is elegant, wonderful and timeless.