Category Archives: Uncategorized

A delicious no-nonsense Rioja

14_04_16 1130 Rioja at The Wine Bar_1600_BlogLife does not have to be over-complicated, instead of fretting over every little thing that we are planning to do, we should just enjoy. The 2010 CVNE Crianza affords this possibility. So full of fruit and vitalilty, this one simply goes down easily. Made from 80% Tempranillo, 20% Garnacha tinta and Mazuelo (now say that three times or more), this wine is so Spanish. Yet it maintains an almost New World spin. This is Rioja of great pleasure. Tell the chef in the house to grill some lamb and get ready to enjoy the simple pleasures of life. #cvne #cune #rioja #crianza #spanishwines #tinto #grilled lamb

Roast Pork, white rice and brown gravy

Okay, you intense wine guys and super health folks, I fully realize that white rice has no nutritional value, but this dish when made right is really delicious. My question is what is the wine match? I like cru Beaujolais, such as a Saint-Amour or Fleurie or Brouilly (three of the 10 crus). I like a gentle red with lots of fruit and choosing these three crus seemed perfect. Give these reds a slight chill and enjoy. A good friend of mine Terry Tenopir recommends the Andre Ostertag Riesling from Alsace, hmm, that could be good too. What do you think? @wine_com

Tempranillo Day

It’s International #TempranilloDay – time to celebrate by opening up your favorite bottle of Tempranillo and sharing what you’re drinking and why you love it.

This grape, indigenous to Spain, is actually the fourth most planted wine grape in the world. It produces wines that are medium to full-bodied, with flavors of plum and cherry and a slight earthy note. With a food-friendly structure and excellent value, these wines are perfect for the fall season.

Tempranillo is the base for the majority of wines from Rioja and the Ribera del Duero. But it’s not limited to these regions – Spain actually has over 60 different regional names for the grape. The variety takes well to oak and you can find some pretty long-lived Tempranillos out there.

Our favorite food pairings include: tapas, paella, spanish cheese & meat, and bocadillos.

Need help finding a great Tempranillo? Check out our selection. Also, today (11/14), you’ll receive 10% off 6 or more bottles. Use code RIOJA in your cart!

Cheers to #TempranilloDay!

Perfect Wines for Trying Parenting Times

siblingsWe posted this through our friends at skinnyscoop.com and received a fantastic response! In honor of Mother’s Day, we though we’d re-post. Cheers!

 

The kids won’t. Stop. Fighting.
WINE: Leeuwin Estate Siblings Sauvignon Blanc Semillon
They may not be able to partake with you, but perhaps you can drink in sibling harmony with Leeuwin Estate’s Siblings. A delicious white that may give you strength to referee fighting in the background.

Not one child will fess up to breaking the vase in the living room
WINE: Innocent Bystander Pinot Noir
Someone had to do it, but no one wants the blame… In honor of your childrens’ ability to sidestep taking responsibility, sip on Innocent Bystander’s Pinot Noir (they also many a delicious Pinot Gris).

You have to give your kid candy to even take a bath/nap/get out the door
WINE: Decoy wines by Duckhorn
Some people call it a bribe, we call it a decoy. After all, aren’t we just distracting our child to get them to do something else? Is it really so wrong… ?

Both you and your spouse forget to pick up the kids at school
WINE: Veramonte Ritual Pinot Noir
No kids like to be forgotten at school, but it certainly happens due to miscommuncation at home! Get into a routine and ritual and sip on Veramonte’s Ritual Pinot Noir. Perhaps a few glasses of this will help you forget that you forgot.

Come home to find your husband has let the kids run amok
WINE: Tait “The Ball Buster” Shriaz
Yep, sometimes you’ve got to bust some balls, especially when you come home to a house in chaos. Sip on the “Ball Buster” Shiraz while you knock some sense into your family.

Toddler has a meltdown in grocery store (or other public place)
WINE: Domaine Serene Evenstad Reserve Pinot Noir (or any of their Pinot Noir)
You leave your cart abandoned in a random aisle as you carry your kicking and screaming 2-year-old out of the store. Time to break out the good stuff. Sip on Domaine Serene Pinot Noir to help melt away the stress.

You’re called into school to discuss your child’s “behavior” issues
WINE: L’Ecole 41 wines
You may be dreading that conference at school, but pop open another schoolhouse treat from L’Ecole Winery in Washington State. Their selection is top-notch and will help you focus less on the “other” school you have to see.

A REALLY bad day of potty training
WINE: Clean Slate Riesling
You don’t want to even remember what you cleaned up that day – you just want to start over. Start a clean slate with this crisp and refreshing dry Riesling.

Club 89

Here’s a re-post of one of our favorites!

90UNDER20_worldsbest_167x110One of the most popular sections on Wine.com is our 90 under 20 list, where we feature wines that are rated 90 points or higher by one of the 10 publications we use for ratings, and priced under $20. We like to call it the list where quality meets value. However, as much as our customers love this list, we often wonder what to do to tout the value and delicious properties of wines rated 89 points, just one point under that magical 90. I mean, it is just one point, after all. But it makes all the difference. A paper that gets an 89 grade is only a B+ while one with 90 gets an A-. With just one point difference, the scoring drastically changes.

But with wine, this is not the case. In most publications, the 86 – 89 score range is described as good, very good, excellent and highly recommended. Heck, I’ll take that for a great everyday wine! Especially at a great price. In fact, I’d personally prefer a wine with multiple 88 and 89 scores than a wine with just one 90 point score. Matt Kramer agrees with me (or perhaps I agree with him, as he has a much more experienced wine history than I) in this article where he says:

“The “gimme a 90-point wine” approach offers, I freely admit, the greatest good-wine-to-least-effort ratio. But you might be surprised to learn that even the folks who hand out points know they’re only one path to wine bliss. (I’m an 88-point buyer myself, as the higher up the point scale you go, the more “drama in the glass” you’re likely to get-and I don’t always want quite so much drama with my dinner.)”

More recently, he wrote an article called “The Seven Habits of Highly Ineffective Wine People,” where he listed Habit #5 as: Never buy anything with a score lower than 90 points. He says, “Wine consumers of the world, you know you’re doing this, so ‘fess up. Really, it’s ridiculous. You can fuss about the rightness or wrongness of scoring wines, but the fetishistic fussiness of the 90-point barrier has become absurd. Effectively, it creates a 10-point scale, which doesn’t leave a lot of leeway, does it?

My own experience is that the best deals (and often the best wines for my palate) are those that get 86 to 88 points. There’s nothing magical about 90 points. If you’re one of those “90 points or nothing” sorts, let me give it to you straight: You’re missing out on some great wines and some amazing values.”

Well said Mr. Kramer, as always.

Some wines are underrated – Cabernet Franc, Chenin Blanc and 89 pointers. That’s just my opinion, but I ask you to taste for yourself. Stock up on some 89 and even 88 pointers for your everyday drinking wines and see if you don’t find some amazing winners. You’ll join Club 89 before you know it.