The World’s Best Wine Values under $15.00

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“I just could not spend another dime, I really wanted a wine that my friends and I could just drink and not talk about!” How often do you feel like this? Far too often I am sure. In my wine world, I taste and evaluate all price points and yes my soul awakens when I can taste and savor a glass of Krug Champagne or ponder over a pour of Château Latour – my pocketbook opens just once when those wines come into my periscope. So how about some wines that we all can afford? Where are the great value wines? The trends have been pointing towards Spain, Argentina and Chile, among other areas in the world. I agree those are the usual places that we should look. That said, when value-hunting, looking in unlikely places can often yield incredible discoveries. I have stumbled across three unlikely places for superb values under $15.00. Let’s take a look at Australia, Italy and the USA.

For two decades Australia has been lying in wait to be re-discovered. A star in the 1990’s this multi-faceted viticultural area has been fluttering in space. This was the country that had brought Shiraz (aka: Syrah) to the fore only to become mired in a “cheap” wine mode. Most recently the Aussies have made incredibly fine wines in all price ranges. The 2011 Wild Oats Shiraz drinks exceptionally well. Supported by some subtle sweet tannins for texture, this wine delivers its ripe fruit flavors all the way through its finish. Yes, this is one of the world’s best bargains in fine red wines.

When wine drinkers hear of Tuscany, they think of Chianti. As one of the world’s most revered regions, this area has found its sweet spot in the $20 to $40 range, but every once-in-a-while, one can uncover a super bargain and that is just what the 2010 Borgo Scopeto Chianti Classico offers. Decidedly sassy and true-to-the-region, this wine plays nicely into the hands of those that want to save a few $$$’s.

One area that one never hears of in the value camp is the USA and how about Oregon, no way! The 2013 Acrobat Pinot Gris is so succulently good. Plenty of ripe fruit and nice acidity, this wine outplays many wines in the $20+ range.

While the expensive and exotic marquis wines get all the ink and a few regions in the world have gained the reputation for their “great wine values,” the best values are often found in the most unlikely of places. As a wine retail veteran of 40+ years, I have learn that deals can show up from anywhere in the world. If you are like me (a bargain hunter) let the world be your oyster. Remember the best pearls are often found after the dirt has been washed away.

Introducing Emmolo

Stand back, a new, ultra-premium Merlot and Sauvignon Blanc producer has entered the arena. Jenny Wagner, of the famous Wagner Family of Wines- Caymus Vineyards, Mer Soleil, Conundrum, Belle Glos and Emmolo, put her stake into the ground. Taking her mother’s (Cheryl) vision and drawing from her father’s (Chuck) winemaking acumen, she is producing World Class wines! Learn more from our storyboard below.

5 refreshing whites everyone should be drinking this summer

oystersIf you’re a seasonal drinker like me, you naturally reach for cold white or rose wine in the summer heat.  We all have our go-to wines – Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Grigio, maybe even something like Albarino if you’re feeling adventurous! But there are some great off-the-beaten-path wines that you should be drinking to stay cool and refreshed this summer.  These are my top 5.

Muscadet
Oysters, anyone? Muscadet hails from the western end of the Loire Valley, right near the Atlantic Ocean. The maritime influence leads to a wine with crisp acidity, fresh and lively  – but subtle – fruit and a mineral undertone. Super mild but amazingly quaffable, I adore sipping a chilled Muscadet on its own or with  a light shellfish appetizer.

Picpoul
Pronounced PEEK-pool, you should drink this just because it’s so much fun to say! You should also try it because it’s dang good. A Rhone-based varietal used in the blends of the Southern Rhone and Chateauneuf-du-Pape, Picpoul is a fairly neutral grape, but it’s bright and refreshing and super affordable!

Vinho Verde
This has everything you want in a summer sipper. Bright fruit, crisp acidity, a slight spritz and low alcohol. Beat that! A lovely lunch wine, a great picnic wine, pretty much a go-to for summer fare.

Verdejo/Verdeho
You’ll see this from the NW are of Spain, as well as some in Portugal and even Australia. The wine is dry, but has a great texture that makes it ideal for spicy dishes, like pesto pasta, ceviche or chicken with garlic.

Godello
Ga-ga for godello? Yes! Another Spanish gem, this is my favorite. I think it’s the texture that sells me. It has some Chardonnay-like texture (not from oak but just from the variety) and yet a mineral backbone that gives it this unique quality. Perfect for a dinner where you want a white wine but something that goes with everything. I’m thinking clam bake and lobster boil!

 

P.S. I love you! Time to explore Petite Sirah

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Once upon a time, there was this lonely grape called Petite Sirah. Upon discovery, farmers and winemakers loved this grape so much that they nicknamed it “petet serre” and said it very fast with a grin. The real name of the varietal is Durif (named after a French scientist who crossed Syrah and Peloursin at the end of the nineteenth century). For years, this varietal sat lonesomely on the shelves gathering dust. Customers breezed by it, reaching for Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, Zinfandel and other more famous varietals. It is my intention to bring this varietal to the fore.

Not as ferocious as most Zinfandel, less stately than many Cabernet and much more robust than elegant Pinot Noir, Petite Sirah has found its home among people who simply enjoy wine and food without pretense.  I often call upon it for parties and when the gang comes by on the weekend for outdoor grilling and potluck meals. In today’s lesson, I have chosen three Petite Sirah for your enjoyment.

The 2012 The Crusher shows a shading of wood and plenty of pleasing grapiness. Coats the palate well and invites a plate of polish sausages, hot links and plain ‘ole hot dogs. For a fruiter style, with a bit less wood, I would go for the 2012 HandCraft. Perfectly poised, with its pretty red fruit flavors that pair nicely with roast chicken, I can almost feel the match on my palate. In the lighter and more elegant style, the easy-drinking 2012 Bogle does the trick nicely.

Not just for meals, Petite Sirah can serve as a cocktail wine to be paired with hors d’oeuvres. So take a trek off of the beaten path, snag one of these Petite Sirahs, and educate your palate about one of California’s hottest under-the-radar varietals. For more information, check out the group: P.S. I Love You, here is a link to their website.  I think I’ll grab a bottle of Petite Sirah to enjoy with a savory pot roast  for a comforting dinner on a foggy summer day in the city by the bay.

How do you make rose? #DrinkPink

MiravalRose2Rose, rosado, rosato, vin gris, blush… whatever you choose to call it, it’s the season for drinking pink.  Like seeing the world through rose-colored glasses, we enjoy seeing the summer through a rose-colored wine glass.

While rose is delightful year round, it is especially popular during the summer months. Perhaps the image of sipping Provence rose on the Mediterranean beaches comes into play, but most likely it’s because rose is refreshing, unique and an ideal wine for aperitifs, picnics, BBQs and just about everything else going on in the summer.

Rose is most often (and almost always looking at the rose sold by Wine.com) made using red grape varietals. These grapes most often correlate to a wine’s region. Southern France focuses on Grenache, Syrah, Mourvedre and Cinsault. Rosado from Spain is often Tempranillo or Grenache. Sangiovese-based Rosato from Italy, and then the California rose, which can be made from Pinot Noir, Rhone varieties and just about anything else.

Rose finds its pink color by utilizing brief contact with the red grape skins – much less contact than red wines. The length of time the wine spends with the skins, as well as the grape variety, determine the color of the rose. Longer time of course leads to a darker color, while shorter time results in a lighter-hued pink.  Rose presents a range of colors, from orange-salmon to deep-almost-purple . After skin contact, the juice is separated and fermented like a white wine.

With that in mind, rose is served cold, like white wines. These wines lack tannins due to the short time they spend with the grape skins. Pink wines offer bright acidity, red fruit flavors and excellent texture – flavors and structure of course vary by region and variety.

Stay tuned for more on rose, but in the meantime, check out my top rose picks!

Cheers to drinking pink this summer!