Category Archives: Industry News

Wine.com Releases 2014 Annual Wine.com 100

It’s that time of year… Wine.com has released its eighth annual Wine.com 100. The industry’s only list based solely on consumer purchases, the Wine.com 100 reflects the top 100 wines purchased on the website during the first 11 months of the year.

So who was number 1? It was the Caymus 2012 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon. This is the first year that a wine retailing over $20 topped the list. Caymus released its 40th anniversary Cabernet Sauvignon to much fanfare and accolades. Blessed with the 40th anniversary label coinciding with a fantastic vintage in California, the 2012 bottling quickly rose to the top in units sold on Wine.com. And it remains there.

Other things we noticed on the list.
– Tempranillo was up! Last year, the number one wine on the Wine.com 100 was a value Tempranillo form Rioja. But it was the only Tempranillo on the list. Perhaps riding on the coattails of that #1 spot, this year the list featured 7 Tempranillos, all from Rioja.
– Diversity! Even in the top 10, there are 5 countries represented! Plus 18 different grape varieties, 5 continents, 7 countries and even more sub-regions… Then the prices of these wines ranges from $10 – $100+. Some are classic like Dom Perignon or Veuve Clicquot, but there are so many gems as customers discover new and interesting wines that they love.

It’s a list worth checking out, just to see the trends and popular wines of 2014! See the full list in PDF form!

Tips to make wine ratings work for you

magazines290 points. 92 points. 88 points.

Scores, ratings, critic’s reviews, whatever you want to call them, they can be confusing. And controversial. There are those who live and die by the 100 point scale, refusing to consider a wine not scored over 90 points by their favorite critic. Others disapprove, believing scores have led to a conformity in wines as producers strive to earn scores that will sell, rather than produce a wine of character. This is true; if one crafts a wine in order to achieve a high score from a specific critic, that hurts the integrity of the wine and the scoring system. Wine should have a sense of place, a sense of varietal and preferably, a team dedicated to showing the best of those two features. Continue reading Tips to make wine ratings work for you

The Ultimate Wine Vacation?

tuscantableVacation: an extended period of recreation, especially one spent away from home or in traveling.

Wine Lover: Someone who loves drinking wine, learning about wine, seeing wine regions, meeting wine people.

Ultimate Wine Lover Vacation: Taste Vacations

At Wine.com, we love to promote the wine lifestyle. We do it through awesome selection, helpful guidance and convenient delivery. But we can’t physically take you to wine country. Yet. Luckily… Taste Vacations can!  The newest venture from Zephyr Adventures, Taste Vacations is a new spin on their classic adventure outings.  In the past, adventures put a focus on physical activity while enjoying regional wine and food around the world. Though we all appreciate some physical activity in life, some of us see vacation as taking a break from hiking, biking and scuba diving, instead focusing on less movement, more eating, drinking and savoring. For those folks, Taste Vacations fits the bill. ,

Want to take a wine & food tour in Spain? Done. How about VIP treatment in Napa Valley? Check. Truffle hunting in Italy? They’ve got that, too.

Since Zephyr Adventures has been focusing on organizing tours for years, they know what they are doing. They have the wine connections, the food connections, and the inside scoop on what would make your vacation be the ultimate in taste.

We’ve always supported these Adventures, but loved the info they shared about Taste Vacations as it is sounds like a perfect fit for the Wine.com crowd.

So let us know – do you like the idea of Taste Vacations? What has been your ultimate Wine Vacation?

 

Wine Bloggers are here to stay

14_07_31 1130 Ferrari-Carano 2013 Fume label_4000_Blog

One of the hardest groups to wrap our heads around is Wine Bloggers. Who are they? What do they do? What effect do they have on the wine business? In the old days, newspapers were the only venue, followed by wine newsletters (circa 1970). An aspiring writer had to have a column somewhere. Whether it was a small town paper, an urban newspaper or a syndicated column spanning lots of turf, writers were only considered bona fide it  someone thought they were good enough to be in print.

I attended my first Wine Bloggers Conference in Portland, Oregon two years ago. I met an array of writers from the simple enthusiast to the serious reviewer. Whether they wrote once in a while or often, I assumed that all of them could write, it was simply a matter of how big their audience was and whether they would grow. Recently I attended Wine Bloggers Conference 2014 (Twitter handle: #wbc14) and was even more impressed than I was in Portland. Perhaps because I had become a participant in the wine blogger world and now had a better understanding of what that meant.

The weekend proved extremely educational and enjoyable. Zephyr Adventures, the organizers of this event, put together a tremendous conference that included a little bit about everything. They covered a wide variety of topics, including an insightful presentation (The U.S. Wine Consumer: Who, What & Where) by Michael Osborn, founder and vice president of merchandising at Wine.com, and an incredible tasting of Santa Barbara County Syrah (Syrah Territory: Ballard Canyon hosted by Ballard Canyon Grower Producer Wineries).

As I completed my summary of the weekend in Buellton, I highlighted the Live Wine Blogging – Whites & Rosés as the most exhilarating of all. Two years ago, I poured wines. This time, I joined the bloggers and was seated at a table ready to taste, photograph and tweet. Some wine tasters might regard speed tasting as totally crazy and not productive, but I found that my palate could actually perform well in the ten minute window of chaos that each wine presenter was given. While I tasted and quickly recorded many wines, it was the 2013 Ferrari-Carano Fumé Blanc that I remember most. Aromatic and pure, with notes of citrus peel, melon and grass, the wine’s easy-drinking yet crisp palate stayed with me for a long time following the event.

How will wine bloggers figure in the business of wine? One doesn’t really know; some will blog once in a while and have little research to back their findings, others will write at the level of the great wine writers, most will be somewhere in-between. One thing is for sure: They are here to stay.