All posts by Wilfred Wong

The Wayward Zin has come home…

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What did Zinfandel really want to be? Before the late 1960’s, California was all about cheap dessert wines- White Port, Tokay, Sauternes (skid road sweet wines). Only a handful of producers made varietal wines and they were largely limited to Chardonnay (then called Pinot Chardonnay) and Cabernet Sauvignon. When the first varietal revolution began in the late 1960’s, Zinfandel was in the mix. Continue reading The Wayward Zin has come home…

What is it with these wine competitions anyway?

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In the wine business, we all talk about O-N-D (October-November-December). Success or failure, the fourth quarter is a deciding factor, as we move wine fast. Yet like grape growing, business begins at the start of the New Year. Last week I participated in one of the largest wine competitions in the world- the San Francisco Chronicle Wine Competition. With over 6,300 wines entered and more than 50 judges, divided into 19 panels, this event officially rang the bell for the beginning of the wine judging season. In the United States there are around 30 significant competitions and internationally there are at least half as much. Yet there is much confusion about wine competitions and if they really have an effect on the fortunes of wineries. Continue reading What is it with these wine competitions anyway?

My Top 5 Holiday Wines

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What are the perfect wines to buy for holiday gifts? As all of you know, wine comes in different colors, flavors and price ranges.  So how hard can it be? If I were out there in consumer land, I’d be so confused. Marketing departments are putting their best foot forward and every wine sounds good. But some wines have a little more traction than others and some wines are more perfect for both the giver and the receiver. Below are my Top five holiday gift wines. Continue reading My Top 5 Holiday Wines

Wake up and taste the Tempranillo

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For decades, Spanish wines were second class citizens among top wine growing regions in the world. Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, the Rhône Valley were the gold standard. All French appellations and all revered. The Spaniards, were not new to the party, they just never got the respect that they deserved. But some of it was their doing. Rioja and Ribera del Duero, two long-standing regions, simply never really addressed the international community. Rioja, used an incredible amount of American oak, one would have thought that coconut and dill were primary wine flavors. Continue reading Wake up and taste the Tempranillo