All posts by Gwendolyn

The Green Wine Concept

Ever wonder what makes a wine sustainable, organic or biodynamic? Or wonder what makes it all different? Well, we can help decode those green wine concepts for you below.

Sustainable Practices
Sustainable farming has 3 goals: environmental stewardship, economic profitability and social and economic equity. That means that sustainable farmers are doing their best to give back to the environment and to the community, while also furthering their business. Sustainable farming may occasionally use synthetic materials, but only the least harmful and only when absolutely necessary. The goal is a healthy and productive soil that produces healthy vines and will continue to do so for future generations. Only a few certification opportunities exist for sustainable wines, including: LIVE (Low Input Viticulture & Enology), Oregon Certified Sustainable Wine and the California Sustainable Wine-Growing Alliance.  Plenty of wineries and vineyards practice sustainability, but lack actual certification for their operation, so knowing more about the winery helps should you be making purchasing choices based on environmental stewardship.

ChileVineyardOrganic
Organic farming is one step up from Sustainable. Farmers use no synthetic materials and rely on natural fertilizers and pest control systems; the winery often uses minimal filtration and fining materials and natural yeasts. Most wines termed “organic” are made from organically grown grapes, so you will see “organically farmed” or “organically grown grapes” on the label. The key here is excluding the use of any synthetic materials in the vineyard – no fungicides, no pesticides. Instead, crop rotation, cover crops, compost and biological pest control are used for the vines. For a wine to be deemed “organic” by the USDA, it must contain no added sulfites. Sulfites act as a preservative, and while most producers using organically grown grapes use sulfites minimally, any addition of them deems the wine unworthy of the USDA’s “organic” label. But there are lots of other organizations other than the USDA that certify organic wines. Some of these organizations include California Certified Organic Foundation and Oregon Tilth.

Biodynamic
The biodynamic movement started almost a century ago in the 1920’s. In response to growing concern among European farmers regarding crop vitality in an industry increasingly dominated by chemical materials, Dr. Rudolf Steiner gave a series of lectures presenting the farm as a self-sustaining, living organism that needed to follow the earth’s schedule rather than the farmer’s. In 1928, the organization Demeter was formed. Demeter International is still around today and is the only certifying body for Biodynamic wines. Biodynamic practices use herbs, minerals and even manure for sprays and composts. They also plan vine care and harvesting schedules according to the astronomical calendar. The way Demeter so accurately sums it up: “Biodynamic® agriculture is an ecological farming system that views the farm as a self-contained and self-sustaining organism. Emphasis is placed on the integration of crops and livestock, recycling of nutrients, soil maintenance, and the health and well-being of the animals, the farmer, the farm, and the earth: all are integral parts that make up the whole.” How  you feel about the practice does not really matter because the end product is usually stellar.

It’s also important to note that there are many organic and biodynamic wineries in Europe who have been practicing this type of farming for decades or longer, but they have not been certified due to the cost or bureaucracy involved. Some of them just don’t see the point – they don’t plan to use it for marketing purposes and are just doing what has always made the best wines.

For finding “green” wines at wine.com, look for our green wine icon. Green wine

This represents those wineries using one of the above practices. And share with us your favorite “green” vineyards and wineries.

Happy Earth Day!

 

Green Wines for Earth Day! (Infographic)

Sharing our favorite Green Wines infographic again this year. Happy Earth Day!

Have a Wider Blog? (600 px)

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Have a Thinner Blog? (500 px)

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The legend of Fume Blanc

One of the reasons I love wine is its combination of history, geography, biology, chemistry and marketing. Yes, marketing. Though many romanticize about wine in its purest form, with what’s inside the bottle marketing itself, the fact is wine is a beverage that sees plenty of marketing – through traditional marketing channels, wine publications and even pop-culture (remember Merlot’s demise after Sideways?).

The original bottle look for Robert Mondavi Fume Blanc
The original bottle look for Robert Mondavi Fume Blanc

One of my favorite stories in the marketing world of wine is that of Fume Blanc. In the late 1960s, Sauvignon Blanc suffered a negative reputation. It was too sweet, or too grassy, poorly made, hard to pronounce, and generally avoided by many wine drinkers. About this time, the late, great Robert Mondavi had an opportunity to produce some promising Sauvignon Blanc. Though he knew it would be delicious, he also wanted to sell it, and labeling it as Sauvignon Blanc may not do the trick. Taking a cue from the Sauvignon Blanc-saturated region of Pouilly Fume in France, Mondavi labeled his wine Fume Blanc and used that name for his SB, which was dry-fermented and aged in oak barrels.

Since you’ve most likely seen a bottle of Fume Blanc, you probably know that this marketing decision paid off and easily accounts for Sauvignon Blanc’s popularity today. Mondavi did not trademark the term, so other wineries jumped on the bandwagon, crafting Sauvignon Blanc in the same style and using the Fume Blanc term. These days, Sauvignon Blanc enjoys a stellar reputation and is proudly displayed on labels in California. But many, particularly those established wineries with a few decades under their belt, still use the Fume Blanc moniker for their Sauvignon Blanc. What’s the difference? Though there are plenty of exceptions (as there always are), Fume Blanc typically sees a bit of oak and displays rounder, richer, more melon-like flavors. Sauvignon Blanc aims to bring out the grassy and sharper citrus aromatics of the varietal.

The California wine industry owes much to Robert Mondavi, but the story of Fume Blanc remains one of my favorites to show this legend’s bright mind and influence on California wine. It’s spring, so pick up a bottle of Fume Blanc and toast the man who brought it to life!

 

The Odd Couple: Strip Steak & Sancerre

Wine people seem to always ask other wine people to recall their most memorable wine, or their most exciting wine pairing . I always falter with the first, being lucky enough to have had many an amazing wine memories, but the second I have nailed down. I was in Genoa, Italy with my now-husband after we’d just missed our outbound train to Nice. We had just learned that driving in Italy has a learning curve and we were very far down on it. We found a hotel nearby, wandered the streets and settled on a lovely little restaurant, where we found a most agreeable sommelier. Ordering the local steak, he suggested we pair it with a Sauvignon Blanc from Alto-Adige. Sorry? Don’t you have a more suitable suggestion that might be RED? He asked us to trust him on this. To this day, that pairing is my most memorable. Simple, grilled, local meat and a delicious, local white wine. Not the pairing you would expect, but it was one that wowed. So it makes sense that the other night I found a similar delight.

After the initial sticker shock of realizing how much I just spent on grass-fed NY strip steak at Whole Foods, my husband set out to find a suitable big, blustery Cabernet worthy of drinking with $50 steaks. But the Cabernet was just making the cut for me. So I poured some of the Sancerre we’d brought home and voila. A match. The Sancerre on its own had faltered a little too close to all grass, no fruit and a bit too acidic. One sip after the steak, the fruit coated my mouth, the acidity cut through the fat of the steak and the wine was twice as good as before. It brought me back to that time in Genoa, nearly 10 years ago, and reminded me that food and wine pairing is not a science, it is an art. And one NY strip may taste well with a Cab, but mine was shining with my Sancerre.

A celebration of Australian Wine

AustraliaVineyardsAustralia Day! It’s a great day to do a little education on Australian wines. Not to mention stock up on some of my favorites.

Australia has been in the wine production business for centuries, but only in the last 60 years has it focused on creating dry wines, and only in the last 30 years has it really been internationally recognized in the wine world. Lucky for us, Australian Wine is not a fad –  it’s only growing in quality and popularity.

Australia is one of my favorite wine regions. I once designed an online course for Australia and through all the research and map-drawing and wine tasting, I realized that this may be one of my favorite wine regions. After a visit in 2007, I was not only thrilled with the wines but also the people – seriously, some of the most friendly people we’ve met in the wine industry have been these fantastic people!

wineaustraliaFor our Australia Day celebration at Wine.com, we’re offering 10% off any 6 or more bottles of Australian wine and trust me, it’s not too hard to stock up on a whole 6 bottles. Just depends on your style.

Shiraz? Yes, this is the most popular and most planted grape in Australia, and makes some of the most delicious and diverse wines out there. From value to collectible and from bright and light-bodied to dense and mouth-coating. If you prefer a lighter style, head to Victoria (Yarra Valley, Mornington Peninsula, Bendigo and the like). Big and bold you seek? Barossa is the way to go. And if you’re somewhere in the middle we recommend McLaren Vale Shiraz for you.

Cabernet Sauvignon – two places that do it best. Margaret River in Western Australia (think Bordeaux style) and Coonawarra in South Australia. Coonawarra Cab has such a delicious and distinct flavor profile, it’s almost hard to describe. Eucalyptus, sweet mint, floral, brambly, dark berry fruit… all around a wonderful style of wine. And if you want the structured style of Cab, pick up a bottle from Margaret River to pair with a steak. Sure to delight.

Chardonnay lovers can head to a number of regions, like Margaret River (please try the Leeuwin Estate Artist Series if you love good Chardonnay – you will never go back), Yarra Valley and Eden Valley.

Dry Riesling fans should most definitely pick up wines from the Clare Valley – mineral, wet stone and lime characteristics will jump out of the glass and the acidity will have your mouth singing with glee!

aussiecloudsGrenache, especially of the old vine sort, makes some amazing wines, but also excels in the GSM blends- also known as Rhone blends – you’ll find some excellent ones in South Australia around Adelaide, particularly in McLaren Vale.

Pinot Noir continues to rock from Yarra Valley and surrounding regions, and then you have grapes like Vermentino and Sangiovese making an appearance. In all, it’s kind of like California, where you can find a little bit of everything to fit everyone’s tastes.

Now, here are some of our favorite producers you must look for: Peter Lehmann, d’Arenberg, Yalumba, Penley Estate, Leeuwin, Robert Oatley, Clarendon Hills, Penfolds and plenty more.

Make sure to use code AussieDay at checkout to receive 10% off 6 or more bottles on Wine.com. (ends 1/26/14 at midnight).

Cheers!