All posts by Gwendolyn

Wine and the Working Mom

If you’re a mom, you’re working. You may do it at home, you may do it at home and at an office, but you’re working. Virtually all the time. You may be knee-deep in diapers and nap scheduling, or maybe you’ve moved on to shuttling to school, practice, doctor appointments, or maybe you’re trying to figure out what the heck goes on inside the mind of a teenager. But you’re there, working, in the thick of it. And you probably (because you’re reading a wine blog) think about wine. Possibly often. Possibly even before happy hour.

“Don’t forget to get you mom a bottle of wine for Mother’s Day. After all, you’re the reason she drinks.” 

The connection between wine and motherhood is everywhere. It’s like an  inside joke between every mother who has called it “mommy juice,” or talked about “wine that tastes good in a sippy cup.”  The Facebook page “Moms who need wine” has over 683,000 likes. That’s 683,000+ moms who can relate to wine as a necessity in their role as mom.

So do we NEED wine?
Makes us all sound a bit lushy, doesn’t it? It’s not really the wine we need. It’s definitely part of it, but wine reflects a lifestyle and that’s what I think moms need.   As a company, we try to promote the wine lifestyle through innoeleanorWinevation. As a mom of 3 young girls (5 and under), the wine lifestyle means slowing down.  The end of the day is a time to unwind,  decompress and relax, whether it’s from being at an office or herding kids. Or both. And I (and others) like to do that with a glass of wine. Beyond the calming effects of the alcohol, those sips are about taking time away from frantically picking up or unpacking school stuff. It’s about slowing down and taking a break. With the kids, without the kids, over dinner or in a bath. Wine helps us enjoy life, and more than anyone, Moms need to remember to do that! So when you “need” wine, remember you really need to slow down. Sip and savor the wine. And your crazy, busy, joyful life.

So Happy Mother’s Day to all the moms out there! I hope you celebrate with a delicious glass of wine :) And if you have a mom, go get her a nice bottle! She needs it.

The Green Wine Concept

Ever wonder what makes a wine sustainable, organic or biodynamic? Or wonder what makes it all different? Well, we can help decode those green wine concepts for you below.

Sustainable Practices
Sustainable farming has 3 goals: environmental stewardship, economic profitability and social and economic equity. That means that sustainable farmers are doing their best to give back to the environment and to the community, while also furthering their business. Sustainable farming may occasionally use synthetic materials, but only the least harmful and only when absolutely necessary. The goal is a healthy and productive soil that produces healthy vines and will continue to do so for future generations. Only a few certification opportunities exist for sustainable wines, including: LIVE (Low Input Viticulture & Enology), Oregon Certified Sustainable Wine and the California Sustainable Wine-Growing Alliance.  Plenty of wineries and vineyards practice sustainability, but lack actual certification for their operation, so knowing more about the winery helps should you be making purchasing choices based on environmental stewardship.

ChileVineyardOrganic
Organic farming is one step up from Sustainable. Farmers use no synthetic materials and rely on natural fertilizers and pest control systems; the winery often uses minimal filtration and fining materials and natural yeasts. Most wines termed “organic” are made from organically grown grapes, so you will see “organically farmed” or “organically grown grapes” on the label. The key here is excluding the use of any synthetic materials in the vineyard – no fungicides, no pesticides. Instead, crop rotation, cover crops, compost and biological pest control are used for the vines. For a wine to be deemed “organic” by the USDA, it must contain no added sulfites. Sulfites act as a preservative, and while most producers using organically grown grapes use sulfites minimally, any addition of them deems the wine unworthy of the USDA’s “organic” label. But there are lots of other organizations other than the USDA that certify organic wines. Some of these organizations include California Certified Organic Foundation and Oregon Tilth.

Biodynamic
The biodynamic movement started almost a century ago in the 1920’s. In response to growing concern among European farmers regarding crop vitality in an industry increasingly dominated by chemical materials, Dr. Rudolf Steiner gave a series of lectures presenting the farm as a self-sustaining, living organism that needed to follow the earth’s schedule rather than the farmer’s. In 1928, the organization Demeter was formed. Demeter International is still around today and is the only certifying body for Biodynamic wines. Biodynamic practices use herbs, minerals and even manure for sprays and composts. They also plan vine care and harvesting schedules according to the astronomical calendar. The way Demeter so accurately sums it up: “Biodynamic® agriculture is an ecological farming system that views the farm as a self-contained and self-sustaining organism. Emphasis is placed on the integration of crops and livestock, recycling of nutrients, soil maintenance, and the health and well-being of the animals, the farmer, the farm, and the earth: all are integral parts that make up the whole.” How  you feel about the practice does not really matter because the end product is usually stellar.

It’s also important to note that there are many organic and biodynamic wineries in Europe who have been practicing this type of farming for decades or longer, but they have not been certified due to the cost or bureaucracy involved. Some of them just don’t see the point – they don’t plan to use it for marketing purposes and are just doing what has always made the best wines.

For finding “green” wines at wine.com, look for our green wine icon. Green wine

This represents those wineries using one of the above practices. And share with us your favorite “green” vineyards and wineries.

Happy Earth Day!

 

Green Wines for Earth Day! (Infographic)

Sharing our favorite Green Wines infographic again this year. Happy Earth Day!

Have a Wider Blog? (600 px)

what are green wines infographic wine.com
Wines

Have a Thinner Blog? (500 px)

what are green wines infographic wine.com
Wine

The legend of Fume Blanc

One of the reasons I love wine is its combination of history, geography, biology, chemistry and marketing. Yes, marketing. Though many romanticize about wine in its purest form, with what’s inside the bottle marketing itself, the fact is wine is a beverage that sees plenty of marketing – through traditional marketing channels, wine publications and even pop-culture (remember Merlot’s demise after Sideways?).

The original bottle look for Robert Mondavi Fume Blanc
The original bottle look for Robert Mondavi Fume Blanc

One of my favorite stories in the marketing world of wine is that of Fume Blanc. In the late 1960s, Sauvignon Blanc suffered a negative reputation. It was too sweet, or too grassy, poorly made, hard to pronounce, and generally avoided by many wine drinkers. About this time, the late, great Robert Mondavi had an opportunity to produce some promising Sauvignon Blanc. Though he knew it would be delicious, he also wanted to sell it, and labeling it as Sauvignon Blanc may not do the trick. Taking a cue from the Sauvignon Blanc-saturated region of Pouilly Fume in France, Mondavi labeled his wine Fume Blanc and used that name for his SB, which was dry-fermented and aged in oak barrels.

Since you’ve most likely seen a bottle of Fume Blanc, you probably know that this marketing decision paid off and easily accounts for Sauvignon Blanc’s popularity today. Mondavi did not trademark the term, so other wineries jumped on the bandwagon, crafting Sauvignon Blanc in the same style and using the Fume Blanc term. These days, Sauvignon Blanc enjoys a stellar reputation and is proudly displayed on labels in California. But many, particularly those established wineries with a few decades under their belt, still use the Fume Blanc moniker for their Sauvignon Blanc. What’s the difference? Though there are plenty of exceptions (as there always are), Fume Blanc typically sees a bit of oak and displays rounder, richer, more melon-like flavors. Sauvignon Blanc aims to bring out the grassy and sharper citrus aromatics of the varietal.

The California wine industry owes much to Robert Mondavi, but the story of Fume Blanc remains one of my favorites to show this legend’s bright mind and influence on California wine. It’s spring, so pick up a bottle of Fume Blanc and toast the man who brought it to life!