All posts by Gwendolyn

A guide to finding value in Bordeaux

It’s a classic region, with classic wines. So often seen as unattainable, and even undrinkable, Bordeaux is slowly overcoming these misconceptions in the wine world. You can find affordable aged Bordeaux, and ready-to-drink young Bordeaux. Just need to know what to look for…

Getting into the wine industry some 10 years ago, I learned about Bordeaux – I memorized the regions and sub-regions, the left bank and right bank and the classifications systems. But over the past decade, I’ve slowly learned to DRINK Bordeaux.

By now I’m sure you know that Bordeaux is not limited to high-priced futures that go in the cellar, or less-than-palatable cheap stuff. But do you know what is a great value in Bordeaux? It seems to be an ongoing process to let the wine drinking population know what kind of Bordeaux belongs on your dinner table, or in the everyday drinking slot.

And, so, here are my tips on finding great “affordable” Bordeaux that you can drink now and, most importantly, enjoy.

1. Find a great chateau in a poor vintage
“Poor” vintage may be a broad statement, but some vintages don’t demand high prices at release, so top producers of the region release wines at lower prices. Even in lesser vintages, great producers craft quality wine, so those are ones to pick up.

Chateau Malartic-Lagraviere 2006 ($49.99)

2. Buy older wines at a value.
Some vintages are highly acclaimed at release (2000 vintage), but then a few years later, even better vintages arrive (2005 and 2009) and so the 2000, and then the 2005, looses some of it’s shine. Those with that vintage to still sell offer a great opportunity: the ability to purchase an older Bordeaux from a great vintage. When I say “affordable” in this sense, I’m not talking under $50, but more like under $100…  Great picks include:

Chateau La Croix du Casse 2000 ($59.99)
Chateau Clos L’Eglise Cotes de Castillon 2005 ($36.99)

3. Find village wines from fantastic vintages
This is my favorite value category… There are highly-acclaimed vintages that demand extremely high prices from top chateau, but a universally wonderful vintage means event the entry-level wines will be delicious. So give some of the under $20 village wines a try! Right now, if you grab wines from 2009, 2010 and 2011, you’ll be in great shape.  This is where I find the most values, so have the most recommendations!

Chateau Haut Bergey 2010 ($37.99)
Chateau Smith Haut Lafitte Le Petit 2009 ($36.99)
Actually, there are so many good ones, this is the list you should shop. Stock up for the holidays and enjoy!

The official wine for not over-cooking your Thanksgiving Turkey

Thanksgiving!

Full oven, crazy family, long day.

Whether you are navigating difficult in-laws or 9 dishes in the oven, you may be looking to that glass of wine.

Don’t fret, we have the wine for you – the one

Doctors_mediumthat will keep you sharp, yet let you sip.

Forrest Estate The Doctors’ Riesling 2012
THIS is the wine. Refreshing, zingy and… reasonable alcohol levels. Anyone else notice the rise in alcohol lately? Makes it hard to sip wine at noon when you’re cooking a turkey. This wine clocks in at a lovely 8.5%. And yet, no detectable residual sugar, just a delicious and refreshing wine that makes it easier to sip through the day.

The story of the Doctors from John Forrest is a great one. Forrest is, in fact, a doctor, who researched and studied and experimented with vineyard techniques to craft a lower alcohol wine. Rather than leaving residual sugar or reverting to reverse osmosis, Forrest avoids any winery intervention by utilizing a specific leaf removal  process in the vineyard. By achieving lower alcohol in the vineyard rather than the winery, Forrest does not have to sacrifice quality for the end result: a delicious, dry refreshing wine, with naturally low alcohol.

And so we have deemed this wine the official wine for NOT overcooking your Thanksgiving turkey. You may also deem it your ideal aperitif wine or perfect summer wine… we’ll leave it to you. Either way, you’ll feel okay about having that second glass :)

Cheers!

Tips to make wine ratings work for you

magazines290 points. 92 points. 88 points.

Scores, ratings, critic’s reviews, whatever you want to call them, they can be confusing. And controversial. There are those who live and die by the 100 point scale, refusing to consider a wine not scored over 90 points by their favorite critic. Others disapprove, believing scores have led to a conformity in wines as producers strive to earn scores that will sell, rather than produce a wine of character. This is true; if one crafts a wine in order to achieve a high score from a specific critic, that hurts the integrity of the wine and the scoring system. Wine should have a sense of place, a sense of varietal and preferably, a team dedicated to showing the best of those two features.

That said, scores and ratings should not completely be overhauled. There are a number of critics out there (we use 13 different critics/publications on Wine.com) and each has their own approach.

To really get the most of ratings, it’s helpful to learn a bit about the publication or critic that reviewed it. If you try a wine that is rated 94 points and don’t like it, look at who the review came from. While you don’t need to memorize every critic’s biography, learning who has similar tastes certainly helps finding wines fit for you. A few tips to help:

-READ the review. Scores are not just a number; there is an explanation behind that number with much more importance than the number itself. Look for terms that speak to you. I love Rhone wines, but if a 94 point Rhone mentions any term that refers to “barnyard,” I avoid it. You may know you like supple tannins, or prefer tart fruit over ripe fruit – look for these terms in the tasting notes.

- If you try a wine a love it, look it up (on our site or others) to see who may have given it a score, if any. If you see a score from say, Stephen Tanzer, take note that Tanzer (and his colleagues) may be similar to your palate preferences in that particular wine category.

- Exploring wine takes practice, and if you want to use ratings in helping you explore, that takes some practice too. You’ll hit a few ugly ducklings before you learn which wines are your swans.

As always, we try to provide you the most information possible at Wine.com so you can find the perfect wine for you! Happy shopping :)

The Ultimate Wine Vacation?

tuscantableVacation: an extended period of recreation, especially one spent away from home or in traveling.

Wine Lover: Someone who loves drinking wine, learning about wine, seeing wine regions, meeting wine people.

Ultimate Wine Lover Vacation: Taste Vacations

At Wine.com, we love to promote the wine lifestyle. We do it through awesome selection, helpful guidance and convenient delivery. But we can’t physically take you to wine country. Yet. Luckily… Taste Vacations can!  The newest venture from Zephyr Adventures, Taste Vacations is a new spin on their classic adventure outings.  In the past, adventures put a focus on physical activity while enjoying regional wine and food around the world. Though we all appreciate some physical activity in life, some of us see vacation as taking a break from hiking, biking and scuba diving, instead focusing on less movement, more eating, drinking and savoring. For those folks, Taste Vacations fits the bill. ,

Want to take a wine & food tour in Spain? Done. How about VIP treatment in Napa Valley? Check. Truffle hunting in Italy? They’ve got that, too.

Since Zephyr Adventures has been focusing on organizing tours for years, they know what they are doing. They have the wine connections, the food connections, and the inside scoop on what would make your vacation be the ultimate in taste.

We’ve always supported these Adventures, but loved the info they shared about Taste Vacations as it is sounds like a perfect fit for the Wine.com crowd.

So let us know – do you like the idea of Taste Vacations? What has been your ultimate Wine Vacation?

 

5 refreshing whites everyone should be drinking this summer

oystersIf you’re a seasonal drinker like me, you naturally reach for cold white or rose wine in the summer heat.  We all have our go-to wines – Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Grigio, maybe even something like Albarino if you’re feeling adventurous! But there are some great off-the-beaten-path wines that you should be drinking to stay cool and refreshed this summer.  These are my top 5.

Muscadet
Oysters, anyone? Muscadet hails from the western end of the Loire Valley, right near the Atlantic Ocean. The maritime influence leads to a wine with crisp acidity, fresh and lively  – but subtle – fruit and a mineral undertone. Super mild but amazingly quaffable, I adore sipping a chilled Muscadet on its own or with  a light shellfish appetizer.

Picpoul
Pronounced PEEK-pool, you should drink this just because it’s so much fun to say! You should also try it because it’s dang good. A Rhone-based varietal used in the blends of the Southern Rhone and Chateauneuf-du-Pape, Picpoul is a fairly neutral grape, but it’s bright and refreshing and super affordable!

Vinho Verde
This has everything you want in a summer sipper. Bright fruit, crisp acidity, a slight spritz and low alcohol. Beat that! A lovely lunch wine, a great picnic wine, pretty much a go-to for summer fare.

Verdejo/Verdeho
You’ll see this from the NW are of Spain, as well as some in Portugal and even Australia. The wine is dry, but has a great texture that makes it ideal for spicy dishes, like pesto pasta, ceviche or chicken with garlic.

Godello
Ga-ga for godello? Yes! Another Spanish gem, this is my favorite. I think it’s the texture that sells me. It has some Chardonnay-like texture (not from oak but just from the variety) and yet a mineral backbone that gives it this unique quality. Perfect for a dinner where you want a white wine but something that goes with everything. I’m thinking clam bake and lobster boil!