All posts by Anne Pickett

Food & Wine Friday: Beef & Bordeaux – it’s what’s for dinner

For many people Bordeaux is a collectible, a wine for old-fashioned wine drinkers. It wasn’t that long ago that Eric Azimov wrote in the New York Times, “Bordeaux, once the world’s most hallowed region and the standard-bearer for all fine wines, is now largely irrelevant.” This great red wine from the Atlantic coast of France is, however, more affordable and more accessible than ever. Whether it is a cheeseburger on a Tuesday night or the finest filet mignon, there is a Bordeaux for every occasion.beef

Wines with the general appellation of Bordeaux are famous for being great values. The 2010 Saint Sulpice represents one of the best wines this level of Bordeaux has to offer. Located near Saint Emilion, this winery has some prime vineyard land to make great red wine. This easy drinking red has aromas of tea and black currants with soft, round cranberry and currant flavors on the palate. Enjoy the St. Sulpice with a flat iron steak and mashed potatoes.

Looking to the North, we have the region of Saint-Estephe. Wines from the cooler zone have a brambly and earthy character, which make them a great accompaniment to any hearty meal. One of my favorite go-to wines over the years has been the Chateau de Pez. This 2008 is dark and brooding with aromas of cedar and cigar box. The cassis fruit is supported chunky tannins. The big, chewy de Pez would be great with a rib eye steak.

Pessac-Leognan is the most southern region of Bordeaux. The creative and innovative winemakers of this growing area are making great wines for a very fair price. Ch. Haut Bergey is a great example of this innovative spirit. Purchased in 1991 by Sylvaine Garcin-Cathiard, every effort is made to create a hand-crafted wine of high quality. All of the improvements and hard work have paid off in this amazing 2010. In a vintage full of great wines, the Haut Bergey is a shining example of high quality for a fair price. Aromas of roasted coffee, vanillin, and tobacco lead to ripe black currant fruit on the palate. The sumptuous flavors are supported by fine tannins and bright acidity to the finish. Keep this wine in the cellar for another 5-10 years. I would pair the Haut Bergey with a standing rib roast…now that’s a great Sunday supper!

makingbeefAll this talk of Bordeaux has me yearning for some beef. One of my favorite local places to shop (in the Bay Area) is Schaub’s Meat, Fish, & Poultry in the Stanford Mall. They are famous for their “Fred steak,” which is a special dry cured beef that is amazingly delicious. Don’t be alarmed by the dark and blackened exterior— it’s just covering the yummy, beefy inside. Below, is an example of a top sirloin roast that my friends and I shared with a bottle of 2000 Grand Mayne, St. Emilion.

Riesling love

Each country has a different way of indicating sweetness levels in wines. Because everything is strictly codified and regulated there, German wines are very easy to learn. On the label, they must have the region where the grapes are grown, the variety, the quality level, and in most cases the sweetness level.  All you need now is a Rosetta stone to crack the code. The most famous German varietal is Riesling, so here is a guide to sweetness levels with that variety in mind.

A QbA wine or Qualitätswein bestimmter Anbaugebiete (isn’t that a mouthful to say!) is the most basic of the 2 major categories of German wines. QbA wines can be grown in one of 13 different regions and the region must be stated clearly on the label. They must use grape varieties that are on an approved list. They must have a minimum alcohol content that is achieved, and they are what most people would call an “off dry” sugar level. For example, Ernst Loosen is considered to be one of the best winemakers in Germany, so his QbA wine is a lot higher quality than the average wine of that category. While the Dr. Loosen Dr. L Estate QbA 2012 is fruity, there is plenty of acidity in the wine to balance it out and make it more appropriate to serve with savory items and not dessert. I love this wine with cheese or roast chicken.

The next level up in German wines is called QmP (Qualitätswein mit Prädikat). These wines have many of the same laws about regions and varieties. In addition, the sweetness levels of the wines are also regulated and must fall within a range that is specified for each level. From driest to sweetest they are Kabinett, Spatlese, Auslese, Berenauslese, and Trockenberenauslese. In special years, grapes that achieve the Bereneauslese or sweeter level and are left to freeze on the vine create a very unique wine called an Eiswein. For the last several years, many German wineries are creating dry or “Trocken” wines. Many of these wines started life with an Auslese level of sugar, but are then fermented to dryness. A great example of a Kabinett level wine is Dr. Loosen Blue Slate Estate Kabinett 2012. It is a blend of grapes from the most famous villages in the Mosel: Graach, Bernkastel, and Wehlen. The bright apple fruit is balanced by flinty, minerally notes and a long crisp finish. I love this wine with grilled fish such as trout or salmon.

Unfortunately, in the United States, there is no special system to rate the sweetness levels in wines, so we have to rely on the winemaker’s description, a recommendation, or tasting the Riesling. Ernst Loosen also makes a high quality Riesling in Washington called Eroica. The Eroica Riesling 2012 is a very high quality wine that has more sweetness than his QbA or Kabinett wines. I love this wine with cheeses or, for an entrée, grilled pork chops with an apple and cornbread stuffing. The Eroica Gold Riesling 2012 is definitely a dessert level wine, which would be perfect with an apple or peach cobbler.

I hope you give Riesling a try. It is a noble grape variety that is very versatile where the wines can be crisp and refreshing to rich and sweet. Trying the wines from a great winemaker like Ernst Loosen is an easy way to learn about Riesling and the sweetness levels in wine. Go ahead and have an adventure tonight with a new wine!