Top 5 Champagnes for Bastille Day!

It’s Bastille Day! La Fête nationale, The National Celebration, The French Revolution!

I can’t help but think of Champagne on a day like this, and what better way to celebrate than pop a bottle of bubbles and yell “Vive La France!”

Here are my top 5 Champagnes that could have been used to celebrate the revolution!

1. Gosset Grande Rose Brut
I love the Gosset Grande Rose Brut. Complex aromas and flavors of yeast, apple and dried flowers mark this effusive, fresh rose. Nice weight and balance, with everything in the right proportion. Founded in Aÿ in 1584 by Pierre Gosset, Gosset is the oldest wine house in Champagne. It also remains one of the most prestigious, considered by many collectors and connoisseurs as the world’s preeminent name in luxury champagne. In 2009, this storied winemaker celebrated a landmark 425-year anniversary.

2. Ruinart Blanc de Blancs
This is a serious Champagne. Smoky and focused, with an intense acidity and tightly knit flavors of white peach, chamomile, crystallized honey, pickled ginger and pink peppercorn. It exhibits lovely texture and offers a long, mineral-tinged finish. Ruinart is the oldest producer of champagne, officially founded in 1729 by Nicolas Ruinart, who was the nephew of the monk Dom Thierry Ruinart. This was the dawn of champagne – prior to 25 May 1728, the wine of champagne was not allowed to be commercially transported in bottles.

3. Taittinger Brut La Francaise
The French Brut, How quintessentially French and perfect for the 14th of July! A mouthwatering version, with a fine, lacy mousse and delicate flavors of poached apple, blackberry, beeswax and lemon confit underscored by a streak of smoky minerality that echoes on the finish. Champagne Taittinger was established in 1931 by Pierre Taittinger on the foundations of Forest-Forneaux, itself established in 1734 and the third-oldest wine producing house of Champagne.

4. Moet & Chandon Imperial
I’m a huge fan of irony and I can’t of thing more ironic than celebrating the fall of the monarchy with an imperial wine! This spectacular wine replaces White Star as the flag bearer for the brand. It is a stunning improvement with a lovely citrus nose that shows hints of white flowers, minerals and brioche; it is smooth textured with graceful structure, bright acidity and showing long, precise and vivid flavors. The largest Champagne house in France, Moët et Chandon was founded in 1743 by Claude Moët.

5. Veuve Clicquot La Grande Dame 2004
The French gave us one of our most enduring symbols of America, the Statue of Liberty, and it would only be fair if we drank the “Le Grande Dame” and think of it as our own Lady Liberty! A fine and lacy mousse is draped over a firm frame of well-integrated acidity, belying the complexity of this elegant Champagne. A delicately woven tapestry of black currant, pie crust, chalk, spring blossom and lemon zest flavors ends with a lasting note of smoke-tinged minerality. The House was founded by Philippe Clicquot in 1772. Since its inception, Veuve Clicquot has been a specialist in Champagnes based on Pinot Noir. Widow Clicquout (Veuve) took over in 1810.

 

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