The ageability of Cabernet

One of the most attractive aspects of Cabernet Sauvignon, especially to collectors, is its ability to age. For a long time. The bountiful phenolics of the grape produce a wine able to age for a very long time in the cellar. Not that every Cab should age, but those made have that ability, and for those who have tasted the result, you are well aware of the benefits you reap when you age the right bottle.

So how do you know if a bottle is worth throwing in the cellar and for how long? For those not terribly experienced with knowing wines, regions, grapes and which wines are meant to age, it’s pretty difficult. A wine’s ageability can only be assessed once it is tasted. It has to have the structure, the backbone, the complexity, the balance and a certain weight to it to be age-worthy. Not to say it has to be a heavy wine, but it needs substance. So many wines taste good right now, right away, and they are meant to! Those that will benefit from age may taste delicious now, they may not. They may taste “tight” or “tannic.” Once you’ve tasted enough wines, you may know which can be cellared longer than others. Until then, take a few things into account.

Region- certain regions are known to produce age-worthy wines, like Bordeaux, Piedmont (Italy), Rioja… And others are known to produce drink-them-now styles, like Australia and Chile. However, regions known for aged wines and regions known for early wines both will produce the opposite as well.
Producer – may be a better way to gauge whether a wine has that cellar potential. Chateau Mouton-Rothschild certainly does not produce a bottle meant to be drunk the same year, while Yellow Tail probably doesn’t make many bottles that will last more than 2.
Price – I realize you should never judge a bottle on price, but if you find a Cabernet under $15, I’m going to take an educated guess that keeping it in the cellar 20 years will NOT make it taste better. Quality wines meant for long term ageing will probably have a higher price tag.
Reviews – I don’t mean ratings, I mean the actual reviews. Read what the critics have to say. They have been tasting wines for some time and have an idea of how long a wine might be able to age. They are not always right, but they often give ranges of when a wine could be drunk.  It may not be exact, but it could help in figuring out if it’s your ideal wedding wine or your 10 year wedding anniversary wine.

Remember, wine is not an exact science, there are no rules that cant’ be broken and it’s all about you. Also remember the majority (and I mean over 90%) of wines are meant to be drunk within the first few years of release. Cheers :)