Women in Wine: Joy Sterling

Joy Sterling, the beautiful mind and soul currently running Iron Horse Vineyards, is one of our favorite women in wine. Her parents, Barry and Audrey Sterling, built this amazing property and winery decades ago, and it continues to flourish under Joy’s leadership.

Name: Joy Sterling

Role/Position: Partner/CEO of Iron Horse Vineyards

How did you get into wine? Thanks to my family.

What is your favorite part about working in the wine industry?  The people! The wine world is wonderfully generous. Iron Horse is my passport. It takes me to many exciting places and is my introduction. Everyone is fascinated about wine. If you want to make friends, bring the wine. I also love that we are fundamentally farmers. That’s what keep us real.

Who is your role model?  My mother, Audrey Sterling, who co-founded Iron Horse with my father, Barry Sterling. She is so elegant, gracious, strong, bold and accomplished, warm and welcoming, fun and funny. Every day, I look in the mirror and wish that I will “grow up” to be just like her.

What is your best wine story?  One of my favorites dates back to the 1960s when my parents, my brother and I were living in Paris. My father became a Chevallier du Tastevin and at a black tie dinner at Taillevent, he shocked the French by winning the blind tasting. It was written up in The Herald Tribune. It was “news” that an American could be so knowledgeable and discerning. That was a turning point, when my parents first started thinking, “Hmm, this is something we could possibly do.”

Favorite Restaurant:  I can’t name just one. I have so many!

Favorite wine region to visit:  We are so lucky. We are so beautifully welcomed all over the world.

Favorite wine (other than yours) to drink:  I admit it. I have a cellar palate. If I had my druthers, I would only drink bubbles. I am lovingly known in my family as a bubble head. And I have to say, I think Iron Horse sits at the same table as the best in the world.

Advice for women going into the wine industry?  Dive right in. The wine world is a real meritocracy. You can start in a tasting room and become president of a winery. There is a long history of women who have succeeded in wine … especially in Champagne. Think of all those widows.

Iron Horse Vineyards

 

 

Why do we swirl wine?

Just Somme Stuff I Think About:  Why do we swirl wine?

Everyone does it – people at restaurants, wine bars, tasting rooms -even the Sommelier at that fancy restaurant does it.

We all know it makes you look like you know what you are doing, a clear cry of, “no newbie here!”

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But swirling wine is not just a way to look important; the action of swirling a wine in the glass does several things.

  • First off, the non-obvious: swirling the wine in the glass enables some evaporation to take place and the more volatile compounds will dissipate; these include sulfides (matchsticks), sulfites, (rotten eggs) or even some rubbing alcohol Why Do We Swirl?smells.
  • Second, it allows the wine to breathe. Swirling allows oxygen to attach itself to the compounds that make up tannins, and rounds them out, giving them a softer nature; this is also why a young wine should be decanted or run through an aerator: Oxygen helps it open up!
  • Third and most important, the swirling of the wine glass activates esters and aromatizes them, which allows you to smell more of the wine, and thus enjoy it more! This is why having a tulip shape glass helps – it concentrates those aromas up to your nose.

But of course, the most important thing to know when swirling wine is to look good while doing it. Make sure you practice at home and when you get to the restaurant you will look like the ultimate pro!


The 2 best ways to look like a pro:

professorThe Professor: Hold by stem with base firmly situated on a flat surface and give it a swift swirl for 4-5 seconds, then breathe intensely while using the phrase “that will do” repeatedly with a seriously academic look on your face. (bonus points for glasses near the bridge of your nose)

Wine visualThe Sommelier: Hold by base with thumb and forefinger lean ever so slightly so that the wine spreads out toward the rim; evaluate the color while making non-verbal low volume grunts of approval or consternation. Bring the wine up and in front of your face change grip to thumb and forefinger around the stem, and swirl counterclockwise for at least 10 seconds. Then breathe in audibly, and say the phrase, “ok, you can pour it,” but pretending that you are doing the server a favor by not sending it back.


All kidding aside, swirling is a good thing and helps you enjoy a great glass of wine!

Cheers!

 

 

Women in Wine: Alisa Jacobson

Welcome to the Wine.com Women in Wine Series! Each week this month we will feature a woman in the wine industry and a bit more about her!

First, Alisa Jacobson, winemaker at Joel Gott Wines, shares her remarks.

LIsaJacobsonName: Alisa Jacobson

Role/Position: Winemaker, Joel Gott Wines

How did you get into wine?  I grew up in Agriculture and enjoyed the farming lifestyle

What is your favorite part about working in the wine industry?  I like how every day is different due to the seasonal aspect of the industry

Who is your role model?  Sarah and Joel Gott have been my mentors for 14 years now – I have learned a lot from both of them.

Favorite Restaurant:  Cook in St Helena

Favorite wine region to visit:  The Rhone region of France

Favorite wine (other than yours) to drink:  Sancerre in the Summer, Rosé in the spring, Grenache in the Winter and Beer during harvest!

Advice for women going into the wine industry?   Its important to share your opinion and have confidence in your abilities.

Food & Wine: Fish Fridays!

The other day a friend asked me, “Why is there always a clam chowder special on Fridays?”.  Well, folks, that comes from “fish Fridays”.  The one day a week when Catholics would abstain from eating meat.  Now, it’s only done during Lent, which is the season before Easter.  In my family, it meant tuna sandwiches for lunch and bacalao, salted cod, at my grandfather’s house for dinner.  Here are a few creative and easy fish recipes with matching wines for your Friday so that you don’t spend all of Lent eating fish sticks!

Buen provecho!

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Anne’s Chilean Sea Bass with Hazelnut Sauce

Sea Bass Image

Ingredients:

  • 2        Sea Bass Filets – Thick
  • 2        Tbsp Light Olive Oil
  • ½ c    Chopped & Roasted Hazelnuts
  • ½ c    Chardonnay or Pinot Blanc
  • 4 Tbsp     Butter – Cold
  • 3 Tbsp     Chopped Parsley
  • Salt & Pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Pre-heat oven to 425 degrees.
  2. Heat an oven-proof skillet on the stove. Add olive oil to heated pan.
  3. Season fish with salt and pepper and sear sea bass filet, skin side down.
  4. Place on skillet and transfer to oven. Roast fish for 15-20 minutes.
  5. Remove from the oven and keep the fish warm on a serving plate.
  6. Return the skillet to the stove at medium high heat. Add the shallots and cook to translucent.
  7. Add the hazelnuts to shallots and then deglaze the pan with white wine.
  8. Turn the heat up to high and reduce the wine until there are only a couple tablespoons of liquid left in the pan.
  9. Reduce the heat to medium. Slowly add the fridge cold butter a hunk at a time to the pan. Swirl to incorporate. Do not stir.
  10. When all of the butter has been added, taste the sauce for salt and pepper and finish with chopped parley.
  11. Spoon mixture over the fish and serve.

Recommendation ideas:

*click image to download PDF recipe cards

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Anne’s Shrimp with White Beans and Cherry Tomatoes

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 lbs   peeled and deveined shrimp (I used 20-25)
  • 3 Tbsp       Olive Oil
  • 1 bunch    Green Onions – chopped
  • 2 cloves   Garlic – minced
  • 2- 15oz cans    Cannellini Beans or White Kidney Beans
  • 1 pint         Cherry Tomatoes – chopped in half (these were an heirloom mix)
  • Salt & Pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. In a sautee pan, sautee shrimp until they are almost cooked.
  2. Remove shrimp and cover to keep warm.
  3. Add green onions to the sautee pan and cook until softened.
  4. Add garlic.
  5. Drain the beans and save the liquid. Add the beans to the pan and some of the liquid.
  6. Add the cherry tomatoes and cook until everything is heated through.
  7. Add back the shrimp.
  8. If the mixture looks dry just add more of the liquid, white wine or even just water. Adjust for seasoning.
  9. Garnish with more chopped green onion and serve with a big salad and lots of French bread.

Recommendation ideas:

*click image to download PDF recipe cards

 

 

Food & Wine: National Chili Day!

Anne's ChiliIt’s National Chili Day! There are as many recipes for chili as there are people in Texas. Chili is a great dish for these wintery days. Here is my oddball recipe for chili. It is not super hot, so it is wine friendly with some Zinfandel or Rhone. My favorite is topping a baked potato with the chili and the fixings and a big glass of wine!

Recommendation ideas:

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ANNE’S CHILI RECIPE

*click image to download PDF recipe cards

 

 

 

 

 

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