A guide to finding value in Bordeaux

It’s a classic region, with classic wines. So often seen as unattainable, and even undrinkable, Bordeaux is slowly overcoming these misconceptions in the wine world. You can find affordable aged Bordeaux, and ready-to-drink young Bordeaux. Just need to know what to look for…

Getting into the wine industry some 10 years ago, I learned about Bordeaux – I memorized the regions and sub-regions, the left bank and right bank and the classifications systems. But over the past decade, I’ve slowly learned to DRINK Bordeaux.

By now I’m sure you know that Bordeaux is not limited to high-priced futures that go in the cellar, or less-than-palatable cheap stuff. But do you know what is a great value in Bordeaux? It seems to be an ongoing process to let the wine drinking population know what kind of Bordeaux belongs on your dinner table, or in the everyday drinking slot.

And, so, here are my tips on finding great “affordable” Bordeaux that you can drink now and, most importantly, enjoy.

1. Find a great chateau in a poor vintage
“Poor” vintage may be a broad statement, but some vintages don’t demand high prices at release, so top producers of the region release wines at lower prices. Even in lesser vintages, great producers craft quality wine, so those are ones to pick up.

Chateau Malartic-Lagraviere 2006 ($49.99)

2. Buy older wines at a value.
Some vintages are highly acclaimed at release (2000 vintage), but then a few years later, even better vintages arrive (2005 and 2009) and so the 2000, and then the 2005, looses some of it’s shine. Those with that vintage to still sell offer a great opportunity: the ability to purchase an older Bordeaux from a great vintage. When I say “affordable” in this sense, I’m not talking under $50, but more like under $100…  Great picks include:

Chateau La Croix du Casse 2000 ($59.99)
Chateau Clos L’Eglise Cotes de Castillon 2005 ($36.99)

3. Find village wines from fantastic vintages
This is my favorite value category… There are highly-acclaimed vintages that demand extremely high prices from top chateau, but a universally wonderful vintage means event the entry-level wines will be delicious. So give some of the under $20 village wines a try! Right now, if you grab wines from 2009, 2010 and 2011, you’ll be in great shape.  This is where I find the most values, so have the most recommendations!

Chateau Haut Bergey 2010 ($37.99)
Chateau Smith Haut Lafitte Le Petit 2009 ($36.99)
Actually, there are so many good ones, this is the list you should shop. Stock up for the holidays and enjoy!

The official wine for not over-cooking your Thanksgiving Turkey

Thanksgiving!

Full oven, crazy family, long day.

Whether you are navigating difficult in-laws or 9 dishes in the oven, you may be looking to that glass of wine.

Don’t fret, we have the wine for you – the one

Doctors_mediumthat will keep you sharp, yet let you sip.

Forrest Estate The Doctors’ Riesling 2012
THIS is the wine. Refreshing, zingy and… reasonable alcohol levels. Anyone else notice the rise in alcohol lately? Makes it hard to sip wine at noon when you’re cooking a turkey. This wine clocks in at a lovely 8.5%. And yet, no detectable residual sugar, just a delicious and refreshing wine that makes it easier to sip through the day.

The story of the Doctors from John Forrest is a great one. Forrest is, in fact, a doctor, who researched and studied and experimented with vineyard techniques to craft a lower alcohol wine. Rather than leaving residual sugar or reverting to reverse osmosis, Forrest avoids any winery intervention by utilizing a specific leaf removal  process in the vineyard. By achieving lower alcohol in the vineyard rather than the winery, Forrest does not have to sacrifice quality for the end result: a delicious, dry refreshing wine, with naturally low alcohol.

And so we have deemed this wine the official wine for NOT overcooking your Thanksgiving turkey. You may also deem it your ideal aperitif wine or perfect summer wine… we’ll leave it to you. Either way, you’ll feel okay about having that second glass :)

Cheers!

Wake up and taste the Tempranillo

PicMonkey Collage

For decades, Spanish wines were second class citizens among top wine growing regions in the world. Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, the Rhône Valley were the gold standard. All French appellations and all revered. The Spaniards, were not new to the party, they just never got the respect that they deserved. But some of it was their doing. Rioja and Ribera del Duero, two long-standing regions, simply never really addressed the international community. Rioja, used an incredible amount of American oak, one would have thought that coconut and dill were primary wine flavors.

Then came the 1990’s and top US importers like Jorge Ordonez and Eric Solomon sought out top producers and potential stars on the Iberian Peninsula and transformed this under-appreciated viticultural area and world began to notice. Today, one of Spain’s most notable varietals, Tempranillo, has become très chic amongst the wine cognoscenti. On Thursday, November 13, 2014, our team celebrated International #TempranilloDay and tasted a few of our favorites.

Tempranillo produces a red wine of elegance and style. While much of it is centered on Rioja and Ribera del Duero, the varietal has shown success in California and Argentina. Over the next two decades, Tempranillo will enjoy worldwide fame; the grape is so adaptable, and it is just a matter of time that we will see top offerings from more than just Spain. Seldom too tannic or extracted, this varietal has found great love amongst those who enjoy Pinot Noir and Merlot, an dis perfect for foodies who would like to taste their dishes along with the wine.

Three of my favorites are the fresh and fruity ’12 Palacios Remondo La Vendimia Rioja (50% Garnacha Pais and 50% Tempranillo), the rich, yet fruit-forward ’09 Siglo Crianza Rioja (made from Tempranillo, Mazuelo and Graciano) and the long and delicious ripe fruit, slightly oaked ’10 Vina Hermina Crianza Rioja (85% Tempranillo and 15% Granacha). Celebrate International Tempranillo Day! The varietal has grown by leaps and bounds.

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